Tim Reynolds - Message Board
Tim Reynolds - Message Board
Home | Profile | Register | Active Topics | Members | Search | FAQ
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

 All Forums
 Tim Reynolds Message Board
 TRelated Topics
 INTERVIEWS & REVIEWS
 New Topic  Topic Locked
 Printer Friendly
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 09/27/2002 :  04:13:32 AM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
Centre Daily Times (State College, PA)
September 13, 2002
Page: 6C

CD REVIEW{

"Chaos View"

Musician: Tim Reynolds
BY MATT SWAYNE

Label: TR Music

Release date: Set for release in late September 2002

Details: Get out your safety goggles and put on your lab coats: Tim Reynolds takes experimental to a whole new freaky level with his latest CD, "Chaos View."

Reynolds, who doesn't seem content to be regarded merely as an exceptional guitarist, uses this collection of live songs to explore a myriad of influences -- from techno to Middle Eastern. For the most part, the experiment is a success.

When it works, he creates visionary pieces like "Snake," dripping with exquisite Eastern and Middle Eastern flavors. Reynolds uses electronic effects to counterpoint his own inventive guitar work that swirls around Eastern modalities and accents.

Most of the cuts are instrumental. Reynolds brings in the funk for "Hornets Nest," one of the few non-instrumental songs and, with its bluesy vocals, one of the most approachable tunes on the CD.

On the other hand, Reynolds can be downright scary -- think horror soundtrack scary.

"They're Coming Soon" has dark, heavy metal, ax-murdering riffs drowning in throbbing bass and percussion. Then, there's the opening cut of the album ("Chaos View Drip"). It sounds uncomfortably like some of my own experiments on a Casio synthesizer back in the ninth grade.

Unlike Reynolds, I never coupled it with over-driven intonations of words like "mind control" and "observation"; nor did I put it on an album.

Reynolds owes a lot to his band for the success of "Chaos View." Only an exceptionally tight band could keep up with the wild swings and gyrations of Reynolds' continuous musical probing. They can and do throughout the CD.

Despite these misses, Reynolds gets points just for trying on "Chaos View." To paraphrase: to succeed greatly, one must screw up greatly. And while there are a few screw-ups on the album, these cuts do not diminish what is, overall, a daring and intense musical accomplishment.

Rating: HH1/2 (out of five)

By Matt Swayne, for the Times

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Copyright (c) 2002 Centre Daily Times



Can anyone tell me what the funniest part of this review is?

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 09/27/2002 :  06:46:13 AM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
Thanx to Xar for posting this one:

TELL ME

A little Q&A


9/20/2002

Guitar wizard and Dave Matthews Band collaborator Tim Reynolds, never one to follow the predictable path, has a new CD and solo electric tour called "Chaos View." The show features Reynolds' mind-bending guitar-playing set against a completely prerecorded virtual band and a visual onslaught of computer-generated imagery, animation and video footage. The multimedia "Chaos View" comes to the Tralf at 9 p.m. Tuesday; we spoke to Reynolds in between stops, in Canton.

This very tech-heavy show is really different from what people might expect, people who are only familiar with your work with the Dave Matthews Band.

As a guitar player, I like to play with stuff. I've always been into machines, the music I listen to - machines, industrial rock. Done right, this music is very accessible and very arranged. Seriously arranged - even the jams, what jams there are.

What inspired all this gadgetry?

I've been listening to bands that use some of this stuff, Godflesh and Skinny Puppy. I've had these machines for a while, and I play them more like instruments when I record. Once I learned to program them, you can get a good live recording anytime you want. Now I've got a very consistent sound every time I'm on stage. It allows me to be much looser. I'm having so much fun with this band.

But it's not really a band.

Oh, yeah, the "band" even has a name. The Pagan Underdogs. Sometimes I talk to the 'dogs on stage.

What's the theory behind the multimedia images?

I brought the images in because if i didn't, it would be so Las Vegas. Mostly it's just digital animation. Not common stuff, not just the stuff they play at raves. Footage from the war in Panama, all kind of sources. Since there's no band on stage, there's a live element, something to look at. Sometimes there will be a connection, between visuals and music. The chance for something really cool to happen is greater because we're not matching the visuals up with the music. Just come and enjoy the colors!

Reviews of the new album are calling it a concept album dealing with aliens landing on Earth, a "disarming and disturbing trip ..."

What? I make a joke about that on the album, and they probably thought i was serious. It was totally in jest. I personally don't believe in aliens. It's just goofy mythology created by Hollywood.

You last played with DMB in 1998 (when "Live in Chicago" was recorded) and with Dave in winter 1999. Any plans to play with him or the band again?

We may get together to do some acoustic touring sometime in the future. I was contacted last year, by his manager, to do something. But I never heard back, maybe due to 9/11. Dave is the most giving, the sweetest person. He'd be like, "Hey, Timmy, I love what you're doing. Go for it.' "

Do you remember the show in Buffalo on that acoustic tour (in March 1999)? The fans were completely rude, Dave stopped in the middle of "Wild Horses," he told the crowd to shut up?

Yeah, I remember that! Somebody sent me a tape of that show, with Dave yelling at the crowd. I remember thinking, when I go out with my band, I'm going to play really loud and not take any time between songs - go right from one song to the next - to keep everyone quiet. You know, here are these kids with this acoustic show, they're not used to the quiet. I think Dave needed to yell at them. What else could he do?

What do you think of their last few albums?

I know everyone didn't like the album the did with Glen Ballard ("Everyday"), but for me it was cool to hear them do something different. It was really fresh for me.

The Internet is full of rumors that there was a falling out, or that some of the other members of DMB don't want to work with you.

That's so crazy. I could see how that happened, but no way. For one thing, I know he's busy. I'm not going to call him up and say, "Hey Dave, can we do an acoustic tour?" That would be crazy. He's so much bigger now than he was the last time we did the acoustic shows. On my part, it would be a sell-out move, because it's not what I want to do. And I could just sail along into the big time on Dave's name - John Mayer is totally copping that sound and living off that. I've already gotten what I need from working with Dave, spiritually. But I knew I had to go out and do my own work.

- Elizabeth Barr


Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
Go to Top of Page

Silky The Pimp
Alien Abductee

3321 Posts

Posted - 09/27/2002 :  11:20:00 AM  Show Profile  Send Silky The Pimp an AOL message
quote:
Only an exceptionally tight band could keep up with the wild swings and gyrations of Reynolds' continuous musical probing. They can and do throughout the CD.



Haha goofy bastard didn't even read the cd cover.

Go to Top of Page

KevinLesko
Alien Abductee

3712 Posts

Posted - 09/27/2002 :  2:23:03 PM  Show Profile  Send KevinLesko an AOL message
LOL, you should set up an interview with this guy so that he can interview that "tight band". See how long of sitting in an empty room with only some drum machines it takes him to realize his error.

Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 09/28/2002 :  05:09:33 AM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
You all caught that pretty quick. TR really got a BIG, HUGE kick outta that, as you can imagine. He wanted to dedicate the show that nite in State College to Matt, the guy who wrote the review. It made TR extremely happy that the CD actually comes across as A BAND. That is and was his goal from the beginning. Pretty KEWL!!!

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 09/28/2002 :  05:23:59 AM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
Tim Reynolds brings a touch of Dave Mathews Band mystique

By Rick Coates

"Music is not just for entertainment," said Tim Reynolds. "It is created to help us focus on what is great, good and inspirational. Music should make us think, and sometimes even challenge our thinking."
Reynolds is a master guitarist, composer and pusher of the musical envelope as well as a longtime collaborator with Dave Mathews. Reynolds is currently on a solo tour to promote his new CD "Chaos View," due in stores just days before his September 21 show at the Loading Dock in Traverse City.
Performing on stage with the Dave Mathews Band, and appearing on several of Mathews' CDs has propelled Reynolds to a gothic status in the industry especially among guitar players. Yet despite all of his work with Dave Mathews he was never officially a member of the band.
"I have people ask me if I quit or if I was fired," said Reynolds. "I was never in the Dave Mathews band. Since I appear on several of his CDs and toured with him people assumed that I was in his band, but I have always had my own band and the fact is Dave and myself collaborated together."

ECONOMIC FREEDOM
With the Dave Mathews Band being one of the top bands of the '90s, that partnership has afforded Reynolds economic freedom to pursue his other musical interests. He and Mathews remain friends and neither musician is ruling out future work together.
"I made a lot of money working with Dave and that certainly has put me in a position to work on projects of interest to me," said Reynolds. "I wouldn't rule out collaborating with anyone as long as we had common visions. Right now my focus is on music and multi-media."
Reynolds will offer a visual onslaught of computer-generated imagery, animation and video footage all projected on a screen behind him. His outspoken politics and some of the social issues confronting society today will all be reflected in the music and visuals of the evening. Reynolds deals with militarism, mind control and propaganda throughout his show.
"I have always been interested in the visual with the music since seeing some bands experiment with it in the 1970s," said Reynolds. "Pink Floyd and Peter Gabriel did it and some others but I think the expense of it prohibited a lot of bands from doing it."
Despite the expense of adding the visual aspect to his shows Reynolds believes that it is a necessary component for the audience to fully experience his music.
"Having the colors, the visual really gives my instrumental music grounding," said Reynolds. "It gives the audience another way to connect to the music."

INDEPENDENT SPIRIT
Reynolds enjoys his independent approach. He recently moved from Charlottesville, Virginia to New Mexico and refuses to sign a major label deal.
"I have always been independent and won't sign a label deal. It is obvious to me that once you sign you have to come up with a singular thing that is your signature," said Reynolds. "I am just too neurotic to stick with one thing. Record companies create a reference point for you and want expand within that reference point."
His approach is one of a musical explorer. Reynolds is not interested in duplicating what he accomplished yesterday but is rather interested in seeking what is still to be discovered.
"Sometimes during my solo shows people yell for some of the songs I did with Dave Mathews and I think, do I want to break down and be like someone that just gives in to what the fans want?" said Reynolds. "It's not that I don't want to make people happy but if that is the only reason I am doing it then it isn't coming from me. For me I refuse to become homogenized, so my shows are a reflection of me."
Reynolds wants people to understand that his "Chaos View" Tour is where he is at musically and how he sees the world around him. Previous solo tours were acoustic and with the exception of three songs his current tour is electric.
"If you like my acoustic stuff then you should like this," said Reynolds. "I have just put an electric bent to my music. If you only like acoustic music then you shouldn¹t come. I don't want to discourage people from attending but come prepared for a broader interpretation of my music."

BROAD MINDED
Reynolds suggests a broader approach when seeking out music to listen to in general.
"The thing I learned when I first got into music is that most of the good stuff you have to go out and find. There is the stuff (commercial) that everybody buys and it isn't bad stuff but there is more out there," said Reynolds. "There is the stuff under the radar and I like being considered apart of that. When I was young it was that under the radar stuff that was cool."
Despite overall slow sales of CDs and concerts industry wide during the past year Reynolds believes that music is in a very healthy state.
"The business is one aspect of it of all of this and that may be struggling but the bottom line is there is a lot of great music being made right now," said Reynolds. "Music that couldn't have been made 20 years ago, but because of advances in technology people are doing things with instruments that I thought was humanly impossible."
Reynolds' solo show is just that without other musicians and features his mind-bending techniques, drum programming, sequencing and sampling. Utilizing keyboards and midi-technology he plays and sings with his virtual band and is able to improvise and jam on the fly. His music is brooding, hard rocking with a new-jazz, classical and industrial sound to it.
Canadian multi-media artist Peter Prince will open the concert with an acoustic set and visuals of his paintings as well his video work.

Advanced tickets are available at the Loading Dock for $15 and are suggested as Reynolds has a following that travels the country to see him perform and every show on the current tour has sold out. For further information of the mind-expanding evening call (231) 941-4422.

FROM:Northern Express Sept 19-25 Vol 12 No 38 written by Rick Coates.
Thanx to Northern Express and Rick for the story and a text copy to post on the message board.


From the desk of Fluffy: This is a great interview, only bad part is the las 2 paragraphs. Obviously, they are talking about a DIFFERENT Peter Prince and not ALL our shows have been sold out. They have all done very well and quite a few have sold out, but not all.

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
Go to Top of Page

pcbTIM
Alien Abductee

USA
6501 Posts

Posted - 09/28/2002 :  05:34:47 AM  Show Profile  Visit pcbTIM's Homepage  Send pcbTIM an AOL message
quote:

On the other hand, Reynolds can be downright scary -- think horror soundtrack scary.



That's pretty funny too......

"Well you know boys, a nuclear reactor's a lot like a woman: you just have to read the manual and push the right button." - Homer
Go to Top of Page

Jay
Alien Abductee

Vatican City
2279 Posts

Posted - 09/28/2002 :  10:30:14 PM  Show Profile  Send Jay an AOL message
That's the review you guys told me and my dad aboot, right FLuffy? Hehehe! here's a snip from TR:

" So, Jason tells me you talk to your 'Band'" ( Mr. Wiegand)
" Yeah yeah they're really good i talk to them all the time." (Mr. Reynolds)

Hehehe...Tim's such a cool guy...but damn...if you're gonna do an interview or review, at least get some backround...sheesh.

Antoher thing! In teh newspaper here in cleveland, there was a paragraph or two on TR in the entertainment section. It said something along the lines of...
" Tim Reynolds has recently began playing the electric guitar....can anyone say Dylan?"


ANd! On Peabody's website, it said, TR is playing an ACOUSTIC SHOW! Wow, people don't know they're stuff!

Jay
" It's a scavenger hunt in the best of times, a one armed man with a box of dimes. Throw the stick and let the bulldog roll." KJP
Go to Top of Page

KevinLesko
Alien Abductee

3712 Posts

Posted - 09/28/2002 :  11:02:06 PM  Show Profile  Send KevinLesko an AOL message
quote:
Tim Reynolds has recently began playing the electric guitar


holy hell!!! that has got to be the most ubsurd thing I have heard. Seriously, I find that to be more ridiculous than saying he and Dave hate each other. If I were you I'd email the editor of that paper or the author, and perhaps show him this picture of Tim playing an electric guitar 30 FRIGGIN YEARS AGO!!!!!!!!!!



Go to Top of Page

Jay
Alien Abductee

Vatican City
2279 Posts

Posted - 10/01/2002 :  4:52:36 PM  Show Profile  Send Jay an AOL message
that's a LOT of facial hair for 13!

Jay
" It's a scavenger hunt in the best of times, a one armed man with a box of dimes. Throw the stick and let the bulldog roll." KJP
Go to Top of Page

captain_napkins
Is Anybody Here?

31 Posts

Posted - 10/01/2002 :  6:27:54 PM  Show Profile
no way, that picture has to be of him at AT LEAST 14
Go to Top of Page

captain_napkins
Is Anybody Here?

31 Posts

Posted - 10/01/2002 :  6:36:58 PM  Show Profile
oh, and by the way, dunno if anyone else noticed this, but he's playing the chord for the introduction to Tripping Billies...does he use that a lot?
Go to Top of Page

pcbTIM
Alien Abductee

USA
6501 Posts

Posted - 10/02/2002 :  02:00:15 AM  Show Profile  Visit pcbTIM's Homepage  Send pcbTIM an AOL message
That's not the same chord. His pinky is on the high e, when it sould be on the g.............and how the HELL is he doing that? I can't get my pinky to bend that way!

"Well you know boys, a nuclear reactor's a lot like a woman: you just have to read the manual and push the right button." - Homer
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 10/12/2002 :  09:20:23 AM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
Here are a couple of old ones I found while perusing the email list messages I have sent. I may have already posted these on the board, but in case I didn't, here they are. Definitely, still worth a read.

CONCERT REVIEW: Tim Reynolds' guitars entrance Syracuse U. audience


Updated 12:00 PM ET October 26, 2000

By Andrew Parks
Daily Orange
Syracuse U.


(U-WIRE) SYRACUSE, N.Y. -- What a difference a guitar makes. Would
the Stones have rolled without a Keith Richards to complement Mick
Jagger thick lips? Would Led Zeppelin have been anything without the
feedback fuzz of Jimmy Page to add to Robert Plant's croon? Or would
Guns n' Roses -- may they rest in peace, Axl -- have made "November
Rain" without Slash's crucial guitar solo to sell the drama?

The history of rock music was forged by an amplifier and strings.
While Jimi Hendrix was the quintessential guitar player of the 20th
century, Tim Reynolds is an unsung guitar hero for the 21st.
Reynolds, best known for his collaborative work with Dave Matthews
Band, painted vibrant soundscapes with his acoustic guitar all
through the air of Syracuse University's Goldstein Auditorium on
Wednesday night.

It's a shame the room was not even a quarter full when Reynolds took
the stage around 9 p.m. Anyone with the slightest interest in music
would have appreciated the amazing atmosphere Reynolds created with a
few pedals and two guitars.

Reynolds began the evening with some straightforward, simple riffs
off of his 12-stringed Gibson. After just a few minutes, the audience
seemed to fall into a trance created by the hypnotic swirl of chords
around their heads. Eyes rarely strayed from the tips of Reynolds'
fingers, which caressed and sliced through his instrument with ease.

Throughout his hour-and-a-half set, Reynolds maintained a mesmerizing
combination of basic chords over layers upon layers of pedal effects
and abstract sounds. As he strung guitar lines together, the
instrument and man became one.

This marriage of sound and emotion reached its pinnacle when Reynolds
first switched to his six-stringed guitar -- it never came down for
the remainder of his performance.

Reynolds started with a menacing intro manufactured by his delay
pedal and looped it through the serene environment that followed. As
Reynolds danced hand-in-hand with the melody, a variety of sounds
erupted from his fingers into the visibly satisfied ears of the
crowd.

Throughout the night, Reynolds retained his quiet, elusive image and
let his guitar do the talking. Sitars rattled, slabs of funk dropped,
the plucking of the string section of an orchestra brought down
gentle aural raindrops, and a violin floated over the violent
pounding of flesh against frame -- all through the magic of a piece
of wood with cat gut strings strewn across it.

After his performance, Reynolds appeared to be a shadow of the person
he was on stage. While he played, Reynolds lost himself in his songs
and swung between ferocity and beauty.

But when the guitar was not around, Reynolds appeared as a humble
little man.

Reynolds said he is not Buddhist, but he follows some of their
practices, including meditation. Contemplating his surroundings is
one of the things that sets Reynolds apart from the intensity he
portrays in front of crowds. He is a multi-dimensional character who
needs more recognition from the industry and an escape from the
unfortunate DMB pigeonhole.

Before Reynolds took the stage, Johnny Society offered its mix of
country twang and 1980s metal, but was met with a hostile response by
students who shouted at the band to move off stage.

"For those of you who don't want to hear another song, fuck you,"
Kenny Siegal, lead singer of Johnny Society, said to the heckling
crowd beneath him.

His frustration characterized what happened when Reynolds was not on
stage. Although the crowd only amounted to about 200 fans, it had
only one thing in mind -- hearing the guitar wizard play.

(C) 2000 Daily Orange via U-WIRE


Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 11/28/2002 :  5:06:42 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
Interview with Tim before show @ BSU Muncie, Indiana.
By: Rachel Puckett, Feature Writer for Crazewire.com

Rach: So why Ball State? Did you get a lot of requests to come here?

TR: My agent booked me here, I'm just taking advantage of you poor people here.

R: Why do you say that?

TR: Oh I'm just joking, I'm just being facetious.

R: I also read that you were an army brat, I was also.

TR: Yeah also a preachers kid.

R: Oh one of those PKs...

TR: Yeah, he got one of those things in the mail, so he was sort of a second string preacher.

R: So how many places did you live?

TR: Oh I can't remember, a lot, all over. I was born in Germany but we didn't move around a lot in Europe.

R: Yeah, my family was stationed in Germany for a little bit also, I was too little to remember it.

TR: Yeah same here. When I was a kid my parents would be like here's the german boy.

R: Do you ever get people asking you if you can speak German, because I get that a lot.

TR: No, but in grade school I used to carry around a little German dictionary, thinking I could learn it. But of course your in grade school where you don't have time to learn another language, especially when you can barely speak your own.

R: Well what's the question you wish you were asked in an interview but never were?

TR: Thats a great question, I'm so spaced and fried I don't know if I can answer that. That's like going into the part of my brain thats waiting to go home. That's a great question though. The best question ever asked.

(Side note: Tim then graciously bowed to me and I received the Best Question Award as everyone in the room chuckled.)

Fluffy, Tim's manager, then spoke up to say, "Thats the first question I've ever heard him not be able to answer!"

(Side note Again: Tim then proclaimed me "The Master".)

R: Your parents were pretty conservative while you were growing up, do you think they ever imagined they'd be raising a rock star?

TR: Well I don't really think I'm a rock star. A certain amount of success leads to that label, but I'm a dad you know, I've got kids and stuff, I guess like other rock stars are. But it's hard for me to put my name and those words together, I don't think of it like that. Although, growing up as a kid obviously you have delusions of grandeur. When I rock out it fits an element of that vibe, but I'm more into the music. I'm rocking out, it's more that I just enjoy it, you know. Like the rock star thing, I think of Kid Rock. I got my hair cut today, because someone called me Bon Jovi. This (as he points to his head) is not the hair cut of a rock star.

R: Yeah it looked a little fresh cut. I think it's quite liberating that you continue to do your own thing, do you find that your fans respect this?

TR: "My" fans do. (Tim looks down @ some fliers advertising his show, where in bold letters it reads, "Tim Reynolds from the Dave Matthews Bands") I don't know who they are.

R: They seem to be pretty prevalent on your message boards at Timreynolds.com .

TR: Yeah I read those a couple days at a time and then I have to disengage because it's so crazy. It gets real busy when I'm on tour. I have the real narrow vision of someone who is involved in what I am doing, so I don't really see (with fans) what all is going on. It's like what is the universe like? You can surmise and guess, but we are like part of the universe and the universe is so much bigger than us. The idea of what's going on among masses of people is kind of beyond me.

R: Besides other musicians, where else do you get your inspiration?

TR: Man... I get it from books. I'm reading a book now called "The People's History of the United States". It makes you realize that people have always had a brain. Nobody can say that all that's just bullshit. The great thing to do is read, that's what inspires me.

R: Why do you find major record labels "constricting"?

TR: Because they are. They want you to do one thing. They want to start out focusing on one song and one style. It all makes sense for business, but that's not my impression of music. It's much more of what can be done differently the next time. More like, I won't even play Stream, I'm just tired of playing that. This is a free country and I can practice the freedom. Obviously my approach isn't necessarily bent upon being more popular. Although, I like the idea of being popular. I want people to like my music, but not to the point that I'm going to make music with that in mind first.

R: Do you think the voice of the guitar is more powerful than the human voice?

TR: Oh no. I think the human voice is probably the most powerful thing. The guitar at it's best is kind of mimicking the human voice in the sense that your communicating. Although, in the modern mind thinking of what a guitar can do, you think up way more things than a human voice can do. There are some crazy mother F*****'s that can make some crazy mother F***ing noise, no I'm kidding. Ultimately, the guitar and the human voice is the same thing, their the voice of music. It's up to me to be inspired, but the music is already there.

R: Is it true that you rely on a lot of improv to make each show different and special?

TR: The shows are different at this point with the machines. There's less improv, really it's a lot of weirdly arranged things. I do a lot of improv, but over the years I've kind of gotten satisfied with the idea of having an arrangement and then you kind of find the improv in that. As well as with classical music, they'll play a song the same way and same notes, but then they'll improvise the way that they play the notes differently. So it all kind of levels the improv. I look at what I'm doing as like the back of my hand, I don't even think about it. Like with David Bowie, when someone asks, "Who are your influences" and I'll forget and say a bunch of modern things and forget about stuff that's already so much a part of what I do.

R: So why so much emphasis on the electric guitar in this tour?

TR: Most of the time the emphasis is unspoken about the acoustic guitar and I just want to make sure that people know this is what's coming and it's not going to be like Dave Matthews. It's going to be very little acoustic and I just don't want people to be shocked. We make a great effort to do that. I'm not doing that to piss people off, but honestly if I want to make music like Dave I would.

R: Why did you choose 'Chaos View' to express your views on politics and world issues?

TR: Well in a way the original name of that song was just the general idea of chaos. Then, we were trying to decide on what to call this tour. We were looking at a bunch of songs that I was doing and my wife actually thought, "Chaos View, thats great". And really it fits in with the overall thinking about politics. Like in chaos theory and physics, you take all these random events, random numbers and you try to make an order out of it. The idea being that we have a limited intelligence to see order in a lot of things that look like just a mass of chaos. Several hundred years ago the universe was like a big question, eventually everything becomes order because we just understand more. Same with politics, we see all this war and all this crazy stuff and it looks like a bunch of "what the f*** ". But it really makes a lot of sense when you know what's really going on in history. It's kind of scary and f***ed up cause there's a lot more control than there seems to be. The control is basically the people who want to make money and the people who have to work to make stuff for them to make money, and thats the whole history. It's just a big battle between the 'haves' and the 'have nots' and the varying stages between that. Now is the best time to try and change, you won't see it on TV, but change happens in peoples hearts.

R: There's been big talk about the computer generated imagery and video footage that is in your tour, what did you want that to add to your show?

TR: Well besides just something to look at besides my scrawny little a** up there... (haha).
I've always been a big fan of visuals and shows that have really good music and have a 'big' show, kick a**. I've always wanted to do that but I've never had the means, so for this it's a very small scale thing. But if you expect just the acoustic guitar this will be a pretty big deal. The lyrics are very political so we show stuff that kind of enhances the message of the lyrics, which is basically an anti-war thing ultimately. I would like to keep that going.

R: I read one of your quotes where you said, "Music is not just for entertainment it is created to inform and help us focus on what is true and inspirational", what exactly did you mean by that?

TR: You kind of find solace in music that is sad, because you feel sad and there's like a repore there. You don't feel sadder, you feel the release of emotions. Or a song about being happy, it's the same thing. Music is the whole gimmick of emotions and the gray areas in between. It's Rage Against The Machine that inspires me to want to just get up and go, and Peter Gabriel just breaks your heart because he sings about the most sensitive issues and you just like "God." That's the amazing thing about music. Rock and roll is a great thing cause it covers all that area and just like all the music before it classical, folk and everything did that. Rock and roll is just a modern setting.

R: You also called the "Chaos View" tour your most accessible show to date, why is that?

TR: Because it's got drums, base, and vocals and it's pretty much rock music 101 to me. It covers reggae, funk, and others. And because I'm associated with the Dave Matthews Band, when people hear "accessible" they're going to think it's like that. But to me accessible is like Def Tones and whatever, it's all kinds of different stuff. It's just a different kind of accessibility, so I don't know if people are going to get that. But like I said it's accessible to me, because it's the kind of music I like to listen to.

R: Last question, do you have any weird pre-show rituals?

TR: No. Not that anybody else doesn't have. I've been playing music forever, it's kind of like going into my living room when I get on stage.

R: That's it? Oh come on! Nothing weird at all?

TR: Nothing weird, just pretty much smoke pot, but that's a no brainer. Drink coffee and make my set list. The first time I ever played on stage, was when I was in high school for a concert. I remember being freaked out and then I got up there and I was like, "Hey...I like this". Once in a while you get a gig where you get apprehensive, maybe it's just the mood or whatever, but generally it's just normal.

R: So what's up with the green nail polish on your fingers?

TR: Well Halloween was recent and my daughter advised me to wear it.


After the interview, Tim pulled me aside to have me ask him my "unanswerable question" again.

R: What's the one question you wished you were asked in an interview, but never were?

TR: Where were you when the rapture came?

R: Where were you when the rapture came Tim?

TR: That's a good question. It means it already came, therefore I ask you another question. The rapture is a momentary thing, it's happening now and then five minutes later it happens. The rapture is a religious experience, it doesn't take you somewhere, that's the metaphor. People are getting smarter, your getting smarter, I'm getting smarter.

R: After talking to you, I do feel smarter. ha.

TR: And we just continue that, that's it really. The rapture is when we all get smarter.
(and I answered the question after all)


Tim Reynold's show was stronger than I had imagined. I had read about the images that were to be shown and the strong political mood Tim wanted them to bring to the show, but I had no idea what I was in for. Subliminal messages of strong words and thoughts flashed in between scenes of poverty and war. It was as though Tim's crew had unscrewed your head to view the vulgar words and fears that inhibit your thoughts. Explicates, and words like WAR, SEX, and DRUGS littered the screen behind Reynolds. It was powerful to see him standing on stage expressing his emotions through his guitar and to have these images directly behind him. His silhouette stood small before the chaos of the pictures. The audience felt a mixture of emotions from shock to amazement as they all began to appreciate the message Reynolds was trying to convey.

Fluffy, Tim's manager had this to say about the show:

Fluffy: " I feel like we're making a difference. When people come up to me after the show and say something about like, "Oh I didn't know the show was going to be quite so political", whether that's a positive or negative statement, it does say that it made them think. We had a guy right after the very first show of the tour (when we first started doing the visual) who really complained on the message boards about the politicalness of the videos. I told him, "I really respect your opinion but we did what we set out to do, which was to make you think". He responded with, "I go to a show to get away from the news." Then he went into this long backtrack about every image he'd seen on the screen that night. At the end of this argument with this guy, I said "We accomplished what we wanted to do, we made you think. I can tell by what you've written, you thought about every image you saw on that screen. You say you hated it, but you thought about it. I want you to go away and be annoyed so that you do something about it." So we effected him, and that's what's important."

"But we discussed it before we went out. We said some of these images might offend people. When we played in New York we took out a lot of the World Trade Center images just out of respect to the people. We've discussed a lot of what goes on on that screen and decided "Yeah it may offend some people, but we've got a message to get across beyond just putting on a show."

http://www.timreynolds.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=2776

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 11/28/2002 :  5:13:11 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
Acoustically Sound



Tim Reynolds finds solace in his new desert home as he experiments with new sounds
by Erik Ernst, a&e editor

Tim Reynolds is in an acoustic state of mind.
The virtuoso guitarist, who has gained fame for his mostly electric performances with the Dave Matthews Band has recently released an album of purely six- and 12-guitar pieces. He is currently in the midst of a nationwide tour that features only himself, his guitar and the audience.
"There's a really nice repore when everyone is in the same head space, which is no head space," Reynolds explained from his home in Santa Fe, N.M.
"It's almost meditative. It's a group mind that isn't really a mind, but a heart. These are just words for something that's really hard to explain."
His new album, Nomadic Wavelength, is a rediscovery of an earlier style for Reynolds. The album is much in the same spirit as one of Reynolds's earlier recordings, 1993's Stream. It is with the addition of effects on his acoustic guitars that gives the newer album its own distinct sound.
"(Initially) I wanted to record a lot of twelve-string solo pieces without any effects, much like Stream," Reynolds said, "But when I got into the studio I wanted to add a couple of other things. I had written the songs in the beginning of the year, and in my own little world, they were a personal advancement."
With the addition of effects and some subtle beats from an ashiko drum, Reynolds constructed an album that is different from the material he has released in past years. However, this is not surprising for a man who is constantly undertaking many different projects. It is the diversity of musical styles that he is able to partake in that makes his work exciting.
"That's the unconditional drive for me," Reynolds said, explaining how his evolving listening habits have mirrored his recording habits. "I never thought 17 years ago that I would be mad about metal now. A lot of that stuff just made me want to puke."
As he has grown, Reynolds has found an affinity for heavy metal groups whose music has deeper levels than just a thrashing sound.
"Like earlier Nine Inch Nails, I find that really intriguing," Reynolds said. "I would've never thought I would say that, because I listened to jazz and Ravi Shankar and stuff like that. (However), all that becomes more powerful when you listen to something with the raw power of metal. We all can love all kinds of music."
Reynolds, who started his career as a musician in Charlottesville, Va., became a Sante Fe resident in the last four years.
His new life in the sprawling West and his in-house recording studio has made it easy for Reynolds to forget the East.
"(I don't miss it) at all," Reynolds said, "only because where I live now is so big. It's like an expanding environment. Anytime you live anywhere for more than ten years, you feel like you need a new layer."
While Reynolds's relocation has helped him discover new directions in his music, it has also meant that he has had to leave behind his former band, a trio that went by various names like TR3 and Puke Matrix.
With the other band members still living on the East Coast, "The logistics are kind of silly," Reynolds said.
He has also found a new interest in electronic sounds and the Internet which has kept him busy.
"(It's) not that I want to be Joe Technology, because I'm not really good at it," Reynolds said, "but wanting to be the loner musician out West, for me, that is the kind of juice I'm on right now."
Some of the extra time that Reynolds has spent tinkering in the studio has led to extra treats for his fans. He has released a complete two-disc album, ID, on his Web site for free download. The album has twenty tracks with guitar, keyboard, bass and drum machine.
"Now that I have a studio," Reynolds said, "I can do that because it is just fun. I can have the fantasy thing for free and still have my other stuff available on the more traditional media."
"The Internet is a really great technology," he added. "I've seen lots of really cool things happen from it."
Reynolds's newfound love for electronic sounds has gotten him to start writing some things while he is on the road.
"(On this tour) I brought this rhythm machine along, so I can write new samples and program them in," Reynolds said. "I never really wrote on the road (before), except for improvisation at shows. And that's not really writing because its not recorded and you don't come back to it later."
Reynolds's writing style has varied over time, from simply improvising on his guitar to building on a pre-made structure from a drum track.
"When I was younger," Reynolds said, "people would tell me to play a song, and I would say 'F*** that, man, I don't play songs. I jam.' "
A lot of those sentiments have come out on projects like the recently re-issued album, Sticks and Stones - A Collection of Spontaneous Improvisations, on which Reynolds collaborated with Chapman Stick player Greg Howard.
As if releasing new material online and on CD and touring isn't enough, Reynolds is featured on another Dave Matthews Band album, Live In Chicago, which was recorded at the band's last show of the 1998 winter tour. Like most of Reynolds's plans, he is unsure about his future playing with the band.
The last Dave Matthews Band studio album he appeared on was 1998's Before These Crowded Streets.
"Definitely, that possibility is always in the air," Reynolds said.
For now, Reynolds is enjoying life with his family. His six-year-old daughter Eura has even started to take after her father. Her voice introduces Nomadic Wavelength with "Hi everybody. We're going to have the goodest time ever." She is also found singing along to Reynolds's strumming guitar on a hidden track at the conclusion of the album.
"She's a natural," Reynolds said. "She's into (music) you'd expect a 6-year-old to be into, and stuff that Dad does. I have a great copy of her singing a Britney Spears song while I am playing a punk, tri-town dark song."
Reynolds will play an acoustic set at UW-Platteville Monday at 9 p.m. For more information and to download the ID album, log on to www.timreynolds.com.

http://www.uwosh.edu/AT/10-24-01/A&E/story01.htm

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 11/28/2002 :  5:15:14 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
Beyond face value
Tim Reynolds makes music for things that can't be put into words

By T. Christian Hampton
Correspondent


Guitarist Tim Reynolds is probably best known for his association with Dave Matthews. The two friends have recorded and toured together in the past few years -- something Reynolds says has given him enough of a glimpse of huge commercial success to know not to aspire to it. He performs Tuesday, Nov. 13 at the Georgia Theatre.
Special



''It doesn't take much for me to go into rant mode these days,'' says Tim Reynolds upon offering an unnecessary apology at the end of the interview, which he's given by phone from his tour bus in Wisconsin.
The conversation has consisted primarily of Reynolds sharing his opinions on most everything around him: national events, music, culture -- verbose outbursts that aren't rants in an angry sense, just evidence of a restless mind that would not be content existing in this world without trying to challenge and change it.
Currently residing in New Mexico, the guitarist is probably best known for his association with Dave Matthews. The two friends have recorded and toured together in the past few years, giving Reynolds enough of a glimpse of huge commercial success to know not to aspire to it.
''It's good to see what it's like, but knowing myself that's not where I need to go,'' he says.
Inside the cover of his latest CD, ''Nomadic Wavelength'' (TR Music), he offers to his fans a list of ''recommended websites for enacting social change.''
Reynolds says he decided to do this to let ''people know where they can go to get ... information that might help them see beyond the face values of things we are usually presented with, which isn't really as much information as we could use to make better judgments about things like foreign policy and world events.''
''These problems that are happening now are problems that go back for centuries between Christians and Moslems ... it's a deep thing and nobody can look at themselves and see (it) ... Our country is like the teen-ager that has no tendency for self-reflection ... That knowledge is also prevalent; everybody knows it, but nobody wants to take it to the next level and deal with it ... It's a simple thing, but society has become complex, and it's going to take a lot of time to de-complex it and get back to people understanding people individually.''
His active mind is evident in his music, too. His songs are instrumental, mainly based around acoustic guitar, but even without lyrics his need to question and be involved with his surroundings comes through.
Titles like ''Entity,'' ''Stranger in a Strained Land,'' ''Analyze'' and ''Repeat the Question'' reflect his individualistic nature. Reynolds translates his passions so purely into his music that listening to this album with one's eyes closed can invoke an emotional journey of self-reflection and frustration.
''(Music is) one of those things that comes from nowhere and then goes nowhere, in a way. It's kind of mysterious, you know, and that's the beauty of it ... You can describe it, but when it's happening the description doesn't mean anything. ... For me, music is my understanding of all those things that can't be put into words.''


Published in the Athens Banner-Herald on Thursday, November 8, 2001.

http://www.onlineathens.com/stories/110801/roc_1108010010.shtml

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 11/28/2002 :  5:18:19 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
Tim Reynolds & Puke Matrix Theory
By Bob Makin
Long before there was a Dave Matthews Band, several DMB members played with an eclectic, virtuoso guitarist named Tim Reynolds. Reynolds used to perform with them at a Charlottesville joint called Miller's, where Matthews used to bartend. When Dave Matthews Band began to record, they would ask Reynolds to guest. Matthews and Reynolds also would tour colleges as an acoustic duo. One of those shows was captured on Live at Luther College, which recently was released on Matthews' Bama Rags Records. The release coincided with a brief tour between the longtime friends. Reynolds also recently toured with the entire Dave Matthews Band and plans to do so again this summer. When not working with Matthews and DMB, Reynolds leads his own band, Puke Matrix, formerly called TR3. I spoke with Reynolds about his tightness with DMB and his own musical vision.

Did you hook up with Dave Matthews at Miller's?

Yup, in the late '80s. I played there all the time. He was a bartender there. I knew the rest of band way before that. We played together Charlottesvilles since I moved there in '81. I would play with LeRoi and Carter. Dave moved to town in '87. Besides being a bartender he also did a lot of acting. He was the best actor in town, just a natural. He's brilliant.

How did those early days affect your eclectic style?

Getting together with Carter and all those guys. They were always cats who'd play all kinds of music. Stylistically, there were no barriers there. That's part of something we share together. Carter always played rock and jazz. Same with LeRoi. They all grew up Charlottesville. I move there in '81 from the Midwest. We all had a love for music but not just one kind. We'd all get together and play jazz at high society gigs, but we'd also play funk and rock.

It wasn't a big effort to stop and think, OK, we're playing jazz now. It would just come out in the music as one big thing. That developed over the years. I was always into other kinds of music. As soon as I learned rock, I got into progressive rock, then jazz. Then when I got sick of that, I got into world music. So now I've gone full circle, because industrial rock has gotten me back into rock. I like when the lines of music are blurred. I can get into Marilyn Manson, but then I also can bet into bebop guitarist Joe Pass. Trent Reznor is genious in his own way and Joe Pass is a technical wizard, yet he's not related to the way Trent puts music together with computers. He has a whole band on computer, whereas Pass is a whole band with his strings.

I like to play with effects then no effects. One day, I will not touch a guitar, but I'll make music with all these toys that make me sound like a guitarist. Music is like moods. A certain kind of music gets you in a certain mood. For years, I didn't like any modern rock. I didn't open to the esthetic of it. Then, when I was spending some time in the studio with Dave Matthews Band, I was driving one night and the harder stuff kept me awake. So now I've developed a taste for harder music that I never would have considered 10 years ago.

You've been guesting with the Dave Matthews Band and playing acoustically with Dave for some time. Why not just join DMB?

Before they ever started and during and after, I've been doing my own thing for years. It's not the biggest, most popular thing in the world but it means a lot to me, and I like to keep in touch with it. It's gotten more popular working with Dave. I'm doing more and more each year. I'm not in the media as much, but it's a steady thing.

I've been doing TR3 sine '84, but now it's called Puke Matrix. The name comes from the involuntary nature of how the music comes out. The guys in the band make me play wilder than anything else. They make do things I wouldn't think of. TR3 was a jazzy worldbeat thing, but I've wanted to rock out with a rock band since '95. We had to get a different agent, because we couldn't deal with it anymore. He wanted us to be this Grateful Dead jam band. I was like, "Fuck you! I want to rock." Now I'm having so much more fun playing music. That's why I like do all of Dave's gigs, then I go on to the other gig and it make it so fresh. I learn bunch from each and they feed off of each other.

How good of a guitarist is Dave Matthews?

He's really good. He has a unique style, very understated. But it's not like simple folk guitar. He wears his hand out playing those songs. His voicings are based on thirds, and he uses his pinky a lot. A lot of guitar players couldn't hang with his shit. Rock n roll is really about the rhythm guitar. Without the rhythms, the solos wouldn't have as much balls. They wouldn't be anything underneath to dance to it.

How much did the acoustic tour you did with Matthews in 1996 help shape the songs on Crash?

Not that much. When we did Crash, we did a lot of improvising in the studio. The songs would just come up. But Crash was already formed by the time we went out on the road. "Don't Drink the Water" came out of the acoustic shows. That drone jam.

Live at Luther College was recorded before DMB started playing arenas. But now, colleges no longer can afford to book Dave Matthews Band. How much do you think the recent acoustic tour was a thank you to the colleges who helped nuture Dave Matthews Band?

I'm sure that's part of it. I don't really know. But I'm sure comes into play. The main reason is also, because he totally likes to do this. He's really into it. These large venues aren't initmate. People are, like, rowdy, but it's not intimate. It's like, "Ssshhh!" especially on like a Friday night when everybody's partying.

You have your own live album coming out on soon on TR Records, a followup to "Sanctuary." What will that be like?

It's called "Somewhere Else Live." I wanted to divest from the name TR3. That's why we came up with the joke name Puke Matrix. We wanted to clear the area for punking. We don't have moshing, but we're having puking. Half the stuff has been done before, half is new stuff. It's an electric power trio, like Band of Gypsies trying be industiral without computers. I want control my shit for a while. This year, we might do something with a label later. We have few offers, but I want to rock out. People want me do somethng else. I can afford to do things on my own terms, so I want to keep it up. Once get into the pop arena, you have to spend a lot of time nurturing that. It's like being on a presidential campaign until you get to the top, then you can ride it a while. I just want to campaign below the presidential level. I want to hang out with my family and party and keep things fresh. The last thing I want to do is get burnt from being on the road.

You're a big fan of Nine Inch Nails and Marilyn Manson. What musical elements of music do you think your share with those bands?

I just like hard rock from back in the day. I grew up with that kind of music. Those guys harken back to it. Early Manson is like Black Sabbath and Alice Cooper, but it's definitely a modern take, not just copy cat. I hear where he copped some stuff rom that Bowie vibe too. I can relate to that.

I saw you play with DMB in Philly recently and I was really intrigued by the cool sounds you were getting out of your guitar. A lot of it seemed almost like sound effects more than straightahead playing, like the cool whale sounds and bleeps on "Deed Is Done." Comment on how you enjoy that and how it gives a twist to the music.

I've always been fan of that kind of stuff. One thing that happened ... years ago, I used to be able to sing real high and I found during the disco era, I could sing all the girl parts. Then I got into a car accident and severed my vocal chords. I could barely talk for years. Because I lost my ability to sing like that, I focused on different aspects of the guitar. Over the years, it made me take different things up on the guitar. I'm a fan of other instruments, so I like to experiment with sound. Over the years, I've really reconnected with that.

You are an incredibly eclectic musician who can play a variety of styles on a variety of instruments. Comment on how that adds to the spontaneous, improvisational nature of your music.

It just gives me different ideas of what things can sound like. That's almost as important as a musical note. The first time I heard Downward Spiral, those sounds reminded me of the first time I heard Led Zeppelin II. I was like, what the what hell this shit? It's like nothing I've ever heard before. It's the same way with avant garde or Coltrane.

You grew up in a pretty conservative household that initially didn't take your pursuit of music very well. Has your success changed that at all?

Oh yeah. We've long since buried that hatchet. My dad grew up in a fundamentalist scene. And he was in Vietnam. It kind of freaked him out when I got into this hippie music. But over the years he's come to realize that they sent him to bogus, bullshit war. He respects now that I'm making money.

Why move out to Sante Fe, N.M.?

It's like paradise. I'd been in Charlottesville 15 years. Coming from the Midest, that seemed exotic. But since '93, I've been going out there to see friends. I used to always say, "I want to move here someday." It's sunny almost all the time. It definitely has an effect on the mindset. Every day, I wake up, and it's like a sunny summer day. Even in winter, in the heat of the day, I can go in my back yard in a t-shirt and have a cup of coffee. It's nice and so pleasant.

http://www.jambands.com/mar99/features/reynolds.html

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 11/28/2002 :  5:21:28 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
Thursday, April 26, 2001
Mellow melodies
Reynolds shows acoustic genius

Reviewed By Jennifer Slivka
Collegian Staff Writer

Both floors of Crowbar, 420 E. College Ave. were comfortably packed with people eager to hear what guitarist Tim Reynolds had in store for them.

The stage went dark and one of Reynolds's crewmembers lit five chunky candles of varying heights in Gothic candleholders that reached to the floor, and stuck five sticks of soothing incense that smoldered underneath the candles. Otherwise the stage was bare.

As Reynolds strolled across the stage with guitar in hand, the crowd let out a hearty round of applause and shouts. Then it went quiet, and pretty much stayed that way.

Reynolds didn't sing, in fact he barely spoke throughout the entire performance. But he didn't need to.

The few words he did say however, spurred a lot of laughter from the crowd.

"Good evening. All of the songs tonight are about ham," Reynolds said like comedian Andy Kaufman.

The smoke-filled Crowbar felt more like a music recital at times than it did a rock concert. The crowd was mellow, tame and totally absorbed in what Reynolds was doing up on stage.

The first few songs Reynolds played were unadulterated acoustic ballads. His melodies seemed to float above the crowd, but were anything but dull and boring.

In the middle of a song, Reynolds would suddenly switch time signatures and break into an upbeat intricate melody that would elicit an occasional holler of approval from the audience.

Reynolds really started to demonstrate just how much talent he has when he switched guitars and began to sonically experiment and improvise with the use of various floor pedals and switches.

At one point, Reynolds made his guitar whine and echo throughout the Crowbar like whales singing in the ocean.

He scratched, hit and plucked the strings of his guitar to create sounds you normally wouldn't think could come from an acoustic guitar. During one song, Reynolds used the knuckles of his right hand to strum the guitar and clapped his left hand up and down the neck of the guitar to distort the sound.

Reynolds took full advantage of his floor pedals by distorting the melodies he would temporarily record through them. He also created a fuller sounding musical atmosphere by having a certain guitar rift repeat in the background while he played on top of it.

This technology also helped him out when he needed to wipe the sweat off of his face, take a drink of water or tune his guitar.

His set lists are often hard to pin point because he often fuses different songs together during his live performances, but he did play a good number of songs from his new album Nomadic Wavelength (2001), and his last acoustic album See Into Your Soul (2000).

Peter Prince, who in many ways was the exact opposite of Reynolds, opened the show. He was flamboyant and rigid, where Reynolds was laid back and fluid.

Prince followed the theme of solo acoustic guitar by playing one, but that was about it.

Unlike Reynolds's intricate and clean technique, Prince's strumming was clunky and thick. But in a weird way, it worked for him.

His voice reminded me a bit of Joe Cocker without the huskiness, and his attitude reminded me a bit of James Brown without the polish.

The majority of Prince's songs had a blues feeling to them. Although his vocals often reached the point of screaming, when he mellowed his voice during his folk ballads, the result was much more pleasing.

His lyrics told stories, and often his facial expressions and comments to the audience gave off the impression that he might not be right in the head, or had drank an entire pot of coffee before the show.


photo by Lea Anne McGoldrick

http://www.collegian.psu.edu/archive/2001/04/04-26-01tdc/04-26-01darts-2.asp

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 11/28/2002 :  5:24:17 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
Friday, April 27, 2001

Guitarist Tim Reynolds prefers simple performances without props


By Jennifer Slivka
Collegian Staff Writer
Crowbar, 420 E. College Ave. right before the sound check was almost completely devoid of human presence. The club was dark, not like it usually is at night when it's filled with concertgoers — but dusky, like an empty house.

Late day sunlight that peeked through the front door and upper-level windows was the only source of illumination, giving the club a sleepy atmosphere.

A man of small stature and altogether unassuming nature strolled into the Crowbar with his hands behind his back. He quietly absorbed the dark club surroundings and studied the pictures of musical acts on the walls like he was at a museum.

Later that night this quiet man, otherwise known as the 'guitar wizard' would have an attentive Crowbar crowd in the palm of his hand.

All Tim Reynolds needed was his guitar, and nothing else. Well maybe some floor pedals to add some experimental flavor to his solo acoustic performance, but that's it.

"I love the simplicity of it, but it's more of a challenge with no vocals and no props," Reynolds said. "If I don't do it, I'm taking the easy way out."

Reynolds knows what it is like to have those props, when his rock band TR3 would perform. According to Reynolds people had certain expectations from the band and it was harder to put everything together. It just wasn't generating enough business.

His solo tour however is generating enough business; therefore he has no plans in the near future for TR3. But he hopes eventually he will have enough money from his solo work to allow his to return to TR3.

But Reynolds really doesn't do it for the money. "For me, I can stretch this (acoustic performance) more," he said. "It's like meditation because you're physically there but not mentally."

Reynolds said that he often loses himself during long improvisations on stage, sometimes forgetting where he is. "If I start thinking about it, I'll get intimidated because of the surroundings," he said. "There's only microseconds of thought, but mostly nothing."

The current tour is in support of his recently released album Nomadic Wavelength, which Reynolds said is about trying to be an individual in society.

"This album has a lot of sonic experimentation with digital delays," Reynolds said. "It becomes electric even though it's acoustic."

He likens his new album more to his first solo acoustic album Stream because for half of the album he plays on a 12-string guitar, and the songwriting has "more interplay between time signatures."

Reynolds welcomes his fans to tape record his live performances because each performance is unique and he likes people to have access to his music.


http://www.collegian.psu.edu/archive/2001/04/04-27-01tdc/04-27-01darts-7.asp

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 11/28/2002 :  5:25:58 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
Solo Salvation

By picking and choosing his projects wisely, Tim Reynolds is picking and grinning his way toward artistic fulfillment

by Lee Abraham

Tim Reynolds has no regrets. Sure, he had a lock on fame and fortune if he would have joined the Dave Matthews Band, but Reynolds chose the trail less traveled, instead deciding to follow his own muse. That’s not say he turned his back on Matthews, an old buddy from back in the day, he didn’t. Quite the contrary. The two are tighter than ever. But by keeping his options open, Reynolds made it possible to keep their collaboration -and- friendship intact.

"I always kept my own thing going because by the time they were starting to get national recognition I was in my thirties," says Reynolds. "So I already knew myself enough to know that if I were to do that and make it a full time thing, I probably wouldn't hang with it. Whereas if I kind of stayed off to the side and did it whenever they did their records, the longevity would hang." Looking back, the decision still feels right. "Once I started doing my own thing, even though it wasn’t necessarily big and successful, I realized that was what I wanted to do."

-Doing his own thing- brought Reynolds a heavy rep as a fretboard stud. He’s earned it. The guy is one of the best guitar players on the planet. Didn’t start out that way though. Back in the mid ‘80s, Reynolds was struggling just to stay afloat. His salvation - a Monday night gig in Charlottesville, Virginia, playing solo. "I was so poor," he recalls, "that it was like the one gig that kind of kept me from being completely homeless. It started out with an electric guitar and effects, and I developed the effects to make it sound kind of orchestral. Then I dropped that mode and played sitar for a couple of years, just learning how to play instruments on this gig."

After the sitar phase Reynolds went to the 12 string guitar. Around that same time he crossed paths with a boisterous new bartender who had just been hired at the nightclub. His name - Dave Matthews. The two hit it off immediately. "He’s a very funny person," says Reynolds, "Very amazing sense of humor. Funnier than Jim Carey if you ask me. But it was so long ago, and we hung out so many times, I can’t really remember the very first time we met." While the introductions may not stand out, Reynolds vividly recalls their early jam sessions. "We’d do things that we thought were dark and evil, blood rock, or whatever," says an amused Reynolds. "He would do like rap versions of Amazing Grace. I would kind of do the music and he would do the vocals."

Knowing that he wanted to pursue his own projects, Reynolds encouraged Matthews to start a band of his own. What Reynolds didn’t know, was what a huge success that band would be. "When it first started out, I didn’t really think much of it," he recalls. "They would go out on the road and you could tell that they were at least being very successful locally. As in every town, people get really big locally, but you never think that necessarily translates into a national thing. As time went on, it was obvious that they were getting more national recognition."

"As soon as they made their first big record, right after that we did the acoustic tour," continues Reynolds. "So that was kind of like the other thing to do instead of join the band. We actually did those kind of gigs before they even did their first record locally, so that kind of developed for the joy of doing it." -Live At Luther College-, released in early ‘99, captures the unique chemistry between the two. A strong seller, the CD also helped Reynolds establish himself as a household name among the dorm room and frat house set.

Reynold’s new CD, -See Into Your Soul-, goes one step further, It’s -all- Reynolds. "Half the record is solo acoustic guitar recorded with no effects," he explains. "I started out playing bass, and doing that thumb, kind of slapping thing, and also played drums, so all those things come together to form what I do on guitar. The other half is a little harder to describe. It’s acoustic guitar but it’s also acoustic guitar through effects, so it doesn’t sound like acoustic guitar. It has more of -band- vibe. I like to rock out even though I play acoustic guitar and do solo gigs."

For Reynolds, it’s all about balance. Performing solo or with a band, electric, acoustic, or whatever, everything relates to the bigger musical picture. In the end though, it’s the solo acoustic stuff that gets Reynolds excited. "You can play lead guitar in a band and go wail and shred and all that, and it’s kind of fun, but in a way I can do that really easily," he says. "What I like about playing a solo thing is that you have to play the bass and the chords to make it sound like music. I wouldn’t really try to recreate the other half of the album live unless I had a band."

"I actually recorded the record that’s coming out now, last year. Since then I’ve written a bunch more acoustic stuff and some of it’s on the 12 string, so I’ll be playing a lot of 12 string. If there’s anything that I do that’s unique, which I don’t really know because I can’t really observe myself from anywhere other than inside of my own head, it will come out in this idiom as opposed to with a band."

http://www.mrlee.com/artistprofiles/tim%20reynolds.html

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 11/28/2002 :  5:31:57 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
Tim Reynolds shows a complex masterpiece

Travis Kroh
Staff Writer

Like most of the audience at last Saturday's concert at MSUM, I had only been exposed to Tim Reynolds' music through his work with Dave Matthews. Whatever our expectations were, few of usÊ got what we expected.

I'd venture to say that many in the crowd were surprised by the technology Reynolds used during his set. A lot of loops and sampling were peppered throughout the show, using four different guitars, primarily a six-string and 12-string pair of Martins.

Using samples he'd create right on stage, Reynolds weaved an intricate web of loops, and used it as a foundation for his unique brand of ultra-fast, ultra-complex acoustic work. The extensive use of technology during the show was a departure from the norm of acoustic guitarists, but as Reynolds said, "People generally like it because it's big and loud."

The variety of work that went into each tune was astounding. He could bounce his improvisation off of nearly anything, employing the use of prerecorded drum loops and bits and pieces of guitar taps and scrapes to manufacture and almost experimental-sounding masterpiece.

Reynolds himself was curiously silent throughout the show, only speaking a few lines between songs to make short commentary. Shortly before the end of the show, he quietly mentioned, "Remember, in an age when truth is the first victim of war, please think for yourself."

The opener, Greg Howard, played a Chapman Stick, which is an upright guitar-like instrument where the strings are tapped instead of plucked and played with both hands. I've never heard anything like it, and this guy was good.

Howard played a few covers, and it was cool to hear such a different take on stuff like Dave Matthews' "One Sweet World" and Bob Dylan's "All Along the Watchtower."

http://www.spectrum.ndsu.nodak.edu/Backissues/2001-02/11-02/ae/ae_timr.htm


Tim Reynolds thinks I'm smart

"You're yet another person with a brain!" - Tim Reynolds, to me during a phonecall

http://travis.kroh.net/qb/000203.shtml

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 11/28/2002 :  5:34:28 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
ASTRAL PROJECTION REVIEW
TRANSLATED FROM FRENCH(sorry about the grammer Tericee)

Tim Reynolds: "Astral projection"
Label: Bama Rags
Distributor: Importation U.S.
Date of registration: 1999

Astral projection in the wall...
Then there, you say yourselves "oulamaisdidonc, I know this name?!!", and you are right surely! In fact, Tim Reynolds is a guitarist who is caught sometimes with the play of live with Dave Matthews , in duet of guitar folk lit by the jazzo-melody sonorites of the sarabands of notes which cherish the cortex of all one each one, and leave the sadness of a music too quickly stopped by an end. Therefore, I recapitulate, if you know it, it is that you know Dave Matthews, and yet, the exercise of the album reveals Tim Reynolds plus "Rock' roll", and much, but then really much less funk, jazz or even groove that what one could have believed of him. Accompanied by Houston Ross to low and John Gilmore to the battery, guitars, synthé, and the voice of Tim Reynolds engraves a scientist mixes of Massacre , Jon Spencer Blues Explosion , Marcus Miller and first Red Hot Chile Peppers . Seeking to precede the heaviness of rhythmic the rock'n'roll, this album develops the panel of influences which A had its author who shows being a polyglot guitarist of the fingers and kinds, talented in the exercise blues rock'n'roll of "Backdoor", highly skilled in the deferlantes punkrock of "I give up" and astonishing on "Free tibet". A good album for the fans of rock'n'roll in King' S X, but not for the fans of Dave Matthews more funks...
Note oubladi oublada, I have aaaaaauuuuxxx dooooooiiiiiiiiigts badly: (tiff)

http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=fr&u=http://www.djouls.com/rock/timreynolds_astralproject.html&prev=/search%3Fq%3DTim%2BReynolds%26start%3D200%26hl%3Den%26sa%3DN

French Version for any French speaking board members. Pretty funny to look at even if you don't speak french. HEHE

http://www.djouls.com/rock/timreynolds_astralproject.html

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 11/28/2002 :  5:36:54 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
Here is a Press Release for the first show we met LizK at. I have edited out all the boring drivel about Wayne Brady. If you want to read it as well click the link at the bottom.

'WHOSE LINE IS IT ANYWAY?' COMIC WAYNE BRADY TO PERFORM APRIL 26
Also Performing Acoustic Guitarist Tim Reynolds


CHESTERTOWN, Md., April 4, 2001 -- Wayne Brady, comedy genius of the hit ABC show "Whose Line is it Anyway?", and acoustic guitar wizard Tim Reynolds, who has recorded and played with the Dave Matthews Band, will appear Thursday, April 26, 2001, at 8 p.m. in Washington College's Johnson Lifetime Fitness Center. General admission tickets are $25 in advance or $28 day of show. To order tickets, call TICKETMASTER at 410-481-SEAT or 800-551-SEAT.

(EDITED HERE BY FLUFFY)

Tim Reynolds is well known as an occasional guitarist with the Dave Matthews Band and has been called an "unplugged guru" with an uncommon command of melody and dissonance. Reynolds' horizons are so broad, his technical skills so immaculate, that it is difficult to attribute his playing to any one general style. With over 20 CDs in his discography, Reynolds has released his sixth solo CD, "Nomadic Wavelength," this April.

"I'm a fan of experimentation," says Reynolds. "So when it's just me on stage, I really have to focus my energy differently. It's much more crucial that I connect with my audience on some fundamental level."

http://www.washcoll.edu/wc/news/press_releases/01_4_9_brady_reynolds.html

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 11/28/2002 :  5:39:01 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
OUCH!! Here's one that must have been written by that misguided miscreant who wrote those horrible things about TR not having any focus or direction.

Main Entry: [2]miscreant
Function: noun
Date: 14th century
1 : INFIDEL, HERETIC
2 : one who behaves criminally or viciously


April 13, 2000

Spring Fair or ghetto fair?

BY TOM GUTTING
From the Gutt
Is Spring Fair over yet? I'm tired of it already. Ah, I won't rain on everyone's parade for once. I've just been to enough fairs in the past year to last a lifetime. It's got me kind of depressed as Spring Fair approaches.

Last summer, I spent about a week covering 4-H fairs in Indiana as an intern for the South Bend Tribune. It was not the highlight of my summer.

If you don't understand now why I'm tired of fairs, let me explain it to you more clearly.

Let's just say that people everywhere in Indiana love their fairs. And I've seen them come out in droves in St. Joseph, Elkhart, Marshall, LaPorte, Fulton and Starke counties.

They're not there for the carnival rides and crafts, which is what we associate with Spring Fair. Oh, no. They're there for all the 4-H stuff, especially the animal shows and beef auctions.

I should point out that I'm not trying to condemn 4-H, but you have to understand the association among the 4-H fairs and redneck America.

Every 4-H fair in Indiana is set up basically the same way. Near the entrance, you'll find the biggest attractions: barns for pigs, sheep, chickens, rabbits, cows, horses, goats and a bunch of other animals that have been raised by local 4-Hers hoping to win a big prize at the fair.

Nestled among these animal barns, too, is the project display building. All the different projects done by kids in 4-H classes are on display. These range from woodworking and leaf collections to growing vegetables, cake decorating and building model cars.

All of it — along with the smell of manure — helps create a deeply rural feel. And we haven't even gotten to the beef auctions and animal shows.

Maybe I'm just a cultural elitist, but I can't understand the fascination with watching nine and 10-year-olds sticking 1,000-pound cows in the feet with pointed pokers and prancing around a ring.

But that's a huge draw in good ol' Indiana. And it's as good as anything else around.

That must be why there are so many different categories of shows. And we haven't even gotten to the Midway yet!

You would be surprised, though, how similar our very own pride and joy — Spring Fair — is to all these little county fairs. But we're inferior to those good folk. Spring Fair is really just a bastardized version of a real fair.

What we do every April is a crappy crafts show mixed in with food and beer with a splash of third-rate entertainment on top.

Where are the games? Why can't I try to blow up a balloon with a squirt gun? Why can't I throw a lopsided baseball at wooden bottles and win a big stuffed animal for Sally Anne? Why, oh why, can't I be ripped off by carnies?

While I might not get lots of kicks at humble county fairs, at least they do it right. At least they have games that I might win at, rather than just a bunch of opportunities to blow money on food that might very well give me food poisoning.

I'm not getting anything back from Spring Fair. Not even good entertainment.

I love Spring Fair and all, but it's pretty sad when we can't get bigger acts than they do at the Elkhart County fair in Indiana.

Tim Reynolds? Why the hell do we, a top 10 university, get a half-assed Dave Matthews-wannabe instead of the real thing?

Don't even start with the sorry excuses about how big stars don't want to play small venues like Hopkins.

How come schools like Princeton and Yale get big-time acts every year, even when they're playing a tiny auditorium?

It's so poorly done. It's so Hopkins.

There are plenty of quality acts who play the fair circuit. Sure, they might be past their prime, but it's better than watching Tim Reynolds play while I'm trying to imagine being at a Dave Matthews concert.

I would rather see Steppenwolf (very active on the fair scene) or Def Leppard or some great group of old like that. At least it would be an evening of campy fun that would fill up Shriver.

And it wouldn't be pathetic.

But I'm being a knocker, not a booster. I should get on the bandwagon and be grateful for whatever we get here.

Besides, we're at Hopkins. The only thing we're good at is studying.

http://www.jhu.edu/~newslett/04-13-00/Features/4.html

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 11/28/2002 :  5:42:34 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
A Chat With Tim Reynolds

A Luther student talks with the Dave Matthews friend and guitarist

by Lavonne Meyer, Staff Writer, Luther College Chips

Last Tuesday night, the long-awaited Acoustic Evening with Dave Matthews and Tim Reynolds became a reality for Luther concert-goers. Luther was the fifth concert on a 15-city tour of sites primarily in the Midwest and New England. Dave Matthews, of the Dave Matthews Band, and Tim Reynolds, leader of the group TR3, have been collaborating in music for ten years. They first met at a club named Miller's in Charlottesville, Virginia, where Matthews was a bartender and Reynolds frequently performed. Said Reynolds in a telephone interview Tuesday afternoon, "We just started hanging out. It was obvious he had musical talent and charisma."

When asked about touring with Matthews, Reynolds responded enthusiastically. "It's really great -- very lush," he said. He said he is able to enjoy "more luxurious accommodations than I would've experienced without him." Of including so many college sites on their latest tour, Reynolds said, "It's great -- although it's hard to get the vibe of each different place when you're only there for one day."

Of his own band, TR3, Reynolds commented, "I've had my own band for a while in Virginia." TR3 was established as an underground favorite when Reynolds and Matthews first met. "We had a sort of cult following, if you will," he said. Because they have been on the music scene for quite a while, they have "gone through different phases. It's been positive because we've been free to do what we wanted with our music. The bad part would be that we have not pushed ourselves in the commercial sense."

He added that his recent work with Matthews has also helped his own band's endeavors. "We were able to tour all over the U.S. last summer because of the exposure gained from working with Dave," Reynolds said. Overall, Reynolds has greatly enjoyed working with Dave Matthews and plans to continue to do so. "It's been a learning experience," he says, " a great learning experience."

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 11/28/2002 :  5:44:25 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
Time For Tim

Dave Matthews is coming to town with an old friend
By Jim Morekis

Tim Reynolds has a sweet gig. He's played guitar on all three Dave Matthews Band recordings. He's got his own solo career. And he doesn't have to tour with the band. But he can join his good friend on a laid-back acoustic tour like the one hitting Spartanburg Feb. 8. Just Tim and Dave, like the good old days. In 1990, Reynolds was there, guitar in hand, when Dave Matthews took his first steps toward stardom in Charlottesville, Va. At a place called Miller's near the UVA campus, Matthews, then a bartender, approached Reynolds and asked if he could sing a Bob Marley song.


The pair's continuing musical friendship, though not quite on a level with Lennon-McCartney, has at the very least given us a much-needed alternative to "alternative." Politically correct, critics' darlings, video-friendly...Dave Matthews and his band conquered first Charlottesville, then the music press, and finally the world. The band's third release, Crash, is already platinum, and it's a rare one if one of their arena shows don't sell out immediately.

"I don't tour with the full band," Reynolds says, not without satisfaction. "I've got a family and all that. When I go out on the road, I like to be fresh." The acoustic gig at the Spartanburg Memorial Auditorium will be almost all Dave Matthew's material, in the familiar -- dare we say it? -- "Unplugged" format so popular these days. "This will be just the Dave thing," Reynolds says. "I'll just play guitar. It's great to hear Dave sing with no one else, because he's such a good singer."

Reynolds and Matthews did a similar acoustic tour last year. It was so successful they decided to do the current tour, which also takes them to smaller cities with smaller venues than the Dave Matthews Band proper usually plays. Reynolds says there are two big reasons the acoustic tours are so important.
"It's a different way to see what Dave does. It'll be mellow in relation to a concert with the band, but it'll have just as much energy," he says. "Dave talks more. He'll do the comedy/drama thing. He'll say
something funny and then hit you with one of those deep songs of his." Also, there's the obvious: "Dave's so popular, the big shows sell out," he says. The acoustic tour specifically stops at cities that aren't usually graced with the band's presence -- like, oh, say Spartanburg.

On a typical Dave Matthews Band recording, the basic guitar parts come from the mind of Matthews himself. "The functional rhythm parts are always Dave," he says. "He writes the guts of it, because he writes all the songs." The melodic fills and flashier parts are Reynolds', though. And much of the guitar parts that Matthews writes are actually played on the recordings by Reynolds. A proverbial army brat, Reynolds was born in Wiesbaden, Germany, and traveled from post to post in the
U.S. with his family. His father was a Pentecostal military man, which meant he got a dose of down-home religion along with the inevitable push-pull discipline and frugality of military life.
His first gig was playing bass before "writhing congregations of ecstatic worshippers." At his earliest opportunity, Reynolds left home to start his musical career.

In the mid-'80s in Charlottesville, Reynolds formed his own band, TR3, which has coexisted equally with the Dave Matthews projects ever since. In fact, he says, TR3 often shared double billing with the Dave Matthews Band in the early days. You can hear the funky, experimental sounds of TR3 on the 1994 release, Light Up Ahead. It's got a wide-ranging feel, mixing straight jazz, rock, and funk, all played on a variety of instruments. Unlike his role with Dave Matthews, Reynolds shoulders most of the singing with TR3. "I've got only one vocal cord that works, though, so it's a bit different," he says.
Multi-instrumentalist Reynolds performs sitar, mandolin, bass, and even violin with TR3, which he says has helped him view the acoustic guitar in a new light. "It's as much about texture as anything," he says of the use of many different stringed instruments.

Reynolds recently finished a solo recording culled from his gigs at Miller's, Gossip of the Neurons. "It's just me and an acoustic guitar." He says he's happy with the way things have turned out for both him and Matthews, even though their outlooks are different. "I've never really approached this as a business," he says. "I think in the long run, I may end up having a longer musical career because of that." Spend an acoustic evening with Dave Matthews and Tim Reynolds on Feb. 8 at the Spartanburg Memorial Auditorium beginning at 7:30 pm. Tickets are $22.50 and can be purchased at the box office or by calling (864) 233-2525.


http://www.geocities.com/SunsetStrip/Venue/9634/am10.html

http://archive.cln.com/greenville/newsstand/archives/020897/vibes2.htm

PS: THIS SHOW IS LONG OVER!!!!

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 11/28/2002 :  6:05:01 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
Reynolds Rap
One of Charlottesville's Finest Visits Tucson, And It Isn't Dave Matthews.
By Todd McKay

SURELY YOU'VE HEARD of Dave Matthews. His group, the aptly named Dave Matthews Band, is all over the radio, asking you what would you say, and exhorting you to crash into them. DMB is selling millions of records by making the kind of pop music even David Letterman might like. College kids shake their butts to DMB's tight rhythms, VH-1 plays the video for "Crash Into Me" ad nauseam, even my mother has heard of them. All the while Matthews does his goofy ants-in-the-pants dance. The upcoming Dave Matthews/Tim Reynolds acoustic show at UA Centennial Hall sold out in less than two hours. So who is this guy Tim Reynolds.
Reynolds is a mighty fine guitar player and songwriter, a fixture in the Charlottesville, Virginia, music scene, and a guitarist on DMB recordings. Though he grew up on rock and roll, in high school he began listening to jazz which he "got into as an intellectual extension to learn music." By the time he was 18, Reynolds was playing guitar in various experimental bands throughout the midwest, and eventually passed through Charlottesville and "fell in love with the vibe of the place." Sick of the cold, midwestern weather and not feeling particularly enthusiastic about the state of his musical career, Reynolds moved to Charlottesville in 1981.
Built around the University of Virginia, which provides a strong student fan-base and body of people with disposable income, Charlottesville then had a decent jazz scene and still remains supportive of original and experimental music. There Reynolds had the opportunity to play with some of his jazz mentors--musicians like saxophonist Michael Brecker and guitarist John Abercrombie. He played on a recording for a revolving personnel band, called Cosmology, that featured John Scofield, resident jazz guru John D'Earth, and a couple of other musicians who would eventually make their way into DMB. But the sure sign Reynolds spent quality time in jazz circles is that he refers to other musicians as "those cats."
Eventually tiring of the jazz improvisation scene, Reynolds transitioned into solo textural and experimental guitar work, releasing world-beat influenced records in Stix and Stones, and recording with his own trio, TR3. Reynolds played with the DMB musicians in various combinations long before DMB coalesced: DMB drummer Carter Beauford played a few times in TR3, and he and saxophonist/flutist Leroi Moore played some jazz sessions together. Reynolds worked with DMB bassist Stefan Lessard at a downtown Charlottesville bar called Millers, and DMB violinist Boyd Tinsley met Reynolds at a jazz workshop at the University of Virginia. None of this was exactly making Reynolds rich. About 10 years ago, he was offered a weekly solo spot at Millers. Recalls Reynolds: "I was so poor, I thought if I could get one gig a week where I could get a meal, it would help me survive. The guy who used to do it just hated it, because nobody ever came on Monday nights. So he quit the gig, I took it, and it became a thing." The thing it became was an experimental format where Reynolds played guitar, tweaking and warping the sound using effects. After extended listening to Ravi Shankar in his sleep, he taught himself to play the sitar. Later, he taught himself to play the violin and cello, all on the stage at Millers.
Keeping that gig proved fortuitous for Reynolds. Matthews was doing a stint as a bartender at the club, and writing songs. The two hooked upand began playing together, Matthews sitting in on the occasional TR3 gig and Reynolds helping on demos made in Matthews' basement. While Matthews pulled together DMB and hit the road, Reynolds continued to experiment and record solo. Reynolds recently self-released Gossip of the Neurons, a solo piece recorded live at Millers, showcases Reynolds' fascination with manipulating guitar sound into spacey, textural compositions. It contains some traditional song structures, but half the recording is improvised, as Reynolds feels "most honest music is off the cuff."
Reynolds and Matthews have a comfortable musical relationship. When DMB gathers to make a recording, Reynolds goes with them. Not an official member of the band, he's nonetheless billed as "special guest" on the two DMB releases on RCA Records. (You can spot a picture of Reynolds in a photo montage in the liner notes for Under the Table and Dreaming. To the lower left of a photo of Matthews dramatically flashing a peace sign, Reynolds grins broadly.) Special guest status is perfect for Reynolds, as it brings him the financial benefits of playing on DMB releases while allowing him to concentrate on his solo projects and TR3. When the band is taking a break but Matthews wants to play on, Reynolds accompanies him, adding solos and texture to DMB songs while Matthews plays acoustic guitar. The duo did the first such acoustic tour in early 1996 while DMB awaited the release of Crash.
The sold-out Tucson show on Sunday, February 23, is the last date on the duo's six-week tour. They'll be performing all the DMB songs the full band plays, plus an occasional Reynolds tune. Though BluesTraveler's John Popper and DMB bassist Lessard joined the duo for a show in the northeast, most of the tour has been just Matthews and Reynolds having fun and playing loose with the DMB catalogue.
The format allows for some experimentation, which Matthews encourages. "If we come up with some crazy noise during sound check, Dave is into using it for the show," says Reynolds, quick to add that the basic song structure remains--no disintegration into mindless noodling. Recent shows have also included the occasional cover--John Prine, David Bowie, and even a Marilyn Manson song, "Cryptorchid." For those lucky enough to have tickets to the sold-out affair, it promises to be a great evening of guitar, played by a musician's musician and real cool cat. Oh, and that Dave Matthews guy is playing with him, too.


http://www.geocities.com/SunsetStrip/Venue/9634/am8.html

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 11/28/2002 :  6:08:46 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
THINGS DAVE SAID ABOUT TR THAT I HAVE FOUND:

This is a Dave interview where he talks about TR's contribution to Crash. For the complete interview click on the link below. It it far to long to show it all here. I have enclosed the TRelated segment.

"We were more relaxed recording this one," says Matthews, 29, reclining on an overstuffed couch in a New York photographer's studio. "No question about it. We were anxious making Under the Table because it was our first time in a real studio. We used click tracks on everything and we recorded all the bass and drums tracks, then the guitars, then the violin, sax and vocals. This time, we cut our basic tracks live, standing in a circle, so we could see each other, which gave us the atmosphere of a live performance. We were able to play off each other and maintain a continuity from song to song."

As a result, Crash has an earthier, more organic sound than the band's debut effort, even though there is considerably more audible electric guitar on it, courtesy of Tim Reynolds. An old friend of Matthews, Reynolds also played on most of Under the Table, but his playing was largely obscured because he exclusively doubled Matthews's parts. "This time," Matthews notes, "we just said, 'Do what you feel,' and Tim added a lot. He became another voice in the band."

http://www.guitarworld.com/artistindex/9608.matthews.html


This was a story about the Dave Matthews show in Denver. I think you can check the whole article out online at RockyMountainNews.com Dave had some nice things to say about Tim in the interview. I thought I would share them with you.


"It's great that it's the 5 of us, although I can think of no other
guitar player I'd rather be in the room with than Tim Reynolds"..................."I've never had real faith in my guitar
playing. I'm also surprised in the faith that alot of the guys have in my guitar playing. I was really happy to find that, because
(Steve,producer)Lillywhite is always tearing me down. Once we finish
recording, he was always, 'OK, first let's turn Dave off, then mix the recording.' Especially when you have a great guitarist like Tim, you're not going to search thru the buzzes and splinters of my guitar playing to find the good bits."

The article, for those interested in tracking down the entire interview, was called Road Test by Michael Mehle on page 5D.
Denver Rocky Mt News (7/24/00)

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 11/28/2002 :  6:23:09 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
Here are some stories about the T&D tours. They include some worthwhile comments from TR so I thought I would include them here. ENJOY!!

Dave Matthews and Tim Reynolds Blow Through Swarthmore
From Dave's Perspective

At 4:30, Rob "Hoss" Eberhardt '98 pulled up to the PAC and escorted Dave Matthews and his entourage into the building. Dave took a swig of his Samuel Smith's, said hi to Charlie, and sat next to him while Sixteen Feet performed his song, 'Ants Marching.' He listened intently for the right moment to join them onstage. When Scott went into his "drum" solo, he strode onstage behind the Feet, giving them a thumbs up. When he got back to his seat, he asked Charlie, "Was that cool?"

A couple of minutes later, he was walking on with Tim Reynolds, apologizing for missing his plane, and soundcheck - jamming. Three hours, 24 songs, and one beer later, he walked back offstage, shmoozed for about 20 minutes, and left.

From Dave Matthews' perspective, this was a just free show. A chance to jam with his friend, Timmy. He talked about the performance, "Man, I'm glad we got that on tape... we've never played 'Crash' like that. Let's do it that way on the album!"

Back to the studio.

Neither Charlie nor Dave's manager could empathize with the people who left early during the performance. Dave just joked about it over a Jimi Thing on the way to the airport, "no reason to get excited."

Backstage with the Feet and Tim... and Dave "NO REASON TO GET EXCITED!" the man, he grindly spoke. I thought we had scared Dave Matthews and Tim Reynolds off- stage when we started dancing alongside them. But, Charlie told me to get back out there, "he's doing one more." And then. We got a Watchtower.

"No reason to get excited," I said to Chenry, as I walked into the greenroom. I gave Jon Birge his ticket as a memoir, and I think he got Dave to sign it. Dave was signing a bunch of things, but I wanted to talk to Tim.

Tim Reynolds is alot smaller than he sounds. I asked him about his jazz-fusion band, TR3. "We tour around, but I now I'm up with Dave and the band in the studio." Tim, who's apparently the only one who knows what key any given Dave song is in, plays on all of DMB's albums. On Under the Table and Dreaming, Dave plays "'right guitar,' and Timmy plays the rest."

Eugene Sonn '95 walked in and tapped his mini-keg full of Stefan's Strawberry Wheat homebrew, courtesy of the Hoseheads. In the fine Hosehead brewing tradition, it was a shy, understated combination, worthy of its namesake, Stefan Lessard, DMB's bassist. I handed a mugfull to Dave, "Fat show."

"No reason to get excited," I thought I heard him say. "Do you always work so hard?," someone behind me asked. "Only when it's free," Matthews responded, and smiled with one of his eyebrows. Local Dave Matthews and Tim Reynolds wannabe's, Rockwell Church, giggled nearby.

I suddenly realized how crowed the greenroom area had become, when Hoss walked in, mentioned their flight, and they all left. "Oops, don't want to miss TWO planes," Dave smirked, and shook goodbye. I wish I had a dollar for every time someone has asked me what it was like to hang out backstage with Dave... "no reason to get excited."

http://www.geocities.com/SunsetStrip/Venue/9634/am4.html




Dave Matthews and Tim Reynolds get up close and personal tonight

Monday, February 5, 1996
by KRIS FETTKETHER
Daily Staff Writer

All you have to do is ask.
Let that be a valuable lesson to all. It was for a young bartender in Charlottesville, Virg. At a 1900s-drugstore-turned-nightclub called Miller's, a young bartender shyly approached the solo guitarist asking him to sing Bob Marley's "Exodus." The guitarist, self-taught master Tim Reynolds. The bartender, Dave Matthews. It was the beginning of a truly beautiful, and musical, friendship.
For one very special performance tonight, Dave Matthews and Tim Reynolds bring their dueling guitars to Stephens Auditorium for an evening of acoustic magic.

The two met via the bar counter and have been serving up music and jokes ever since. As Reynolds said, his voice dripping with the South, "I was doing music; he [Matthews] was doing music on his own, and we started sharing that -- the acoustic thing." Reynolds said the two decided to do this unique tour because, well, they can. "It works," he said. "It's looser, and people seem to really like that. It also shows Dave in an intimate context. Here, we can just go for the moment, you know? Just be spontaneous."

Yet, while the friends can bask in the glow of spontaneity now, it was anything but that got them where they are. Born in Weisbaden, Germany, the son of a Pentacostal military man, Reynolds spent most of his childhood moving throughout much of the Bible-belt Midwest. His earliest musical introduction began at the age of 12, playing electric bass before writhing congregations of ecstatic worshippers.
Reynolds soon tired of the constraints imposed upon him and left home at 18 to join a group of "experimental" musicians. After absorbing much from them and a dozen other bands, he eventually settled in Charlottesville. This progressive community gave Reynolds the opportunity to form his band TR3; it also introduced him to Dave Matthews.

As singer/songwriter/guitarist of the Dave Matthews Band, Matthews has captured widespread notoriety on RCA's multi-platinum release, Under The Table And Dreaming. It was with Reynolds' encouragement and inspiration that Matthews achieved a vision of assembling his dream group of musicians for the Dave Matthews Band.

Having appeared as a guest guitarist on all Dave Matthews Band releases, Reynolds has tasted a bit of the fame the group is acquiring. But as Reynolds pointed out, not everyone wants their 15 minutes. "I enjoy the spotlight now, but I used to be a bit of a hermit," he said. "I was getting ready to buy a car, and the dealer commented to me that I didn't exist anywhere. I worked hard to be a shadow for quite some time."

But now out of the shadow, Reynolds is perhaps the gem of this dynamic duo. "I've been doing my own music with TR3 since 1984, but this is nice because I can let someone else run the show. I'm off the hook in a way," he explained. "I can do a lot of flavoring, the icing on the cake."

Matthews and Reynolds have taken their two-man show on the road while the Dave Matthews Band takes a break after recording its third album. The close friends and natural pranksters share a love of the road and the adrenaline of playing to a live audience.

But what do they do between shows? "When traveling, I love to look at names of local bands in the paper," Reynolds admitted. "We used to sit in coffee shops and make up silly names for bands, and now we see some of those names we made up are really names of real bands." One no longer has to wonder why the Dave Matthews Band was chosen as a name.

"The gig," as Reynolds calls it, will consist mostly of songs from the Dave Matthews Band with a few of his own acoustic numbers. The repertoire is written up on paper, but with these two, improvisation is king. "We have a playlist, but sometimes we go into a different tangent," he laughed. "I just kind of jam."

The duo acoustic performance starts at 7:30 p.m. at C.Y. Stephens Auditorium. Tickets are so very scarce, but there might be a few left for $23 apiece. Call the Iowa State Center at 294-3347 for more details.

http://www.geocities.com/SunsetStrip/Venue/9634/am2.html


HERE ARE SOME LINKS TO OTHER ARTICLES AND REVIEWS OF T&D SHOWS. MOST MENTION TR OF COURSE, BUT DO NOT HIGHLIGHT HIM. I STILL THOUGHT THEY MIGHT BE OF INTEREST SINCE THEY DISCUSS SETLISTS AND TR SONGS PLAYED ON THOSE PARTICULAR NIGHTS. ENJOY!!!

http://www.geocities.com/SunsetStrip/Venue/9634/am3.html

http://www.geocities.com/SunsetStrip/Venue/9634/am5.html

http://www.geocities.com/SunsetStrip/Venue/9634/am6.html

http://www.geocities.com/SunsetStrip/Venue/9634/am7.html

http://www.geocities.com/SunsetStrip/Venue/9634/am9.html

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 11/28/2002 :  11:39:20 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
BAND IN A BOX

Backstage with acoustic rock mavericks Dave Matthews and Tim Reynolds

By Jeffrey Pepper Rodgers


Photograph by Jay Blakesberg
Reynolds and Matthews warm up at the Berkeley Community Theater in California.


On this crisp spring afternoon outside the Berkeley Community Theater, there's no mistaking the preparations for the ritual called the Big Rock Show. Roadies are unloading a truckful of gear through the closely guarded stage door, and teen- and college-age fans—some of whom have traveled from several states away—are milling around, hoping for a glance, an autograph, or a photo op with the Big Rock Star known as Dave Matthews.

The show tonight marks the end of Matthews' and Reynolds' latest acoustic tour, following the release of their double CD Live at Luther College, recorded in 1996. With two acoustic guitars and Matthews' alternately wailing/whispering voice, this duo brings to life the knotty, intense songs that have made the Dave Matthews Band such a compelling and surprising force in contemporary rock.

As Matthews and Reynolds grab guitars and sit down with me to talk and play music, it's immediately clear that despite their surface differences, these are very close friends and partners in crime. Reynolds has played on all the DMB albums and frequently joins the band on stage, in addition to pursuing his own projects in freewheeling solo guitar improv, rock, and funk. In conversation, Reynolds and Matthews feed off each other's kinetic energy and quick humor (sly and urbane one moment, locker-room adolescent the next), and when Matthews starts playing something on guitar, Reynolds locks in with him in a microbeat.

I've heard that you two met when Tim was playing in a bar in Charlottesville, Virginia, and Dave was the bartender. Is that a true story?

MATTHEWS Mmm, sort of. I think we met before I started working at Millers. We lived in the same town, and I love watching music, and Tim was one of the Charlottesville musicians—

REYNOLDS —posers.

MATTHEWS Posers. I just loved Tim's playing, so then we just got to know each other. The cool thing was that people like Tim had [the trio] TR3, he was doing his solo thing, he was playing jazz gigs, he had tons of gigs. All the musicians were sort of wrapped up together. Carter [Beauford], who's with [the Matthews Band] on drums, played in Secrets and Tim was playing in Secrets, and they probably crossed paths in a lot of different situations. And two of the guys who sat in on this last album [Before These Crowded Streets] were also old friends of ours from Charlottesville—Greg Howard [Chapman Stick] and John D'earth [string arrangements].

Tim, were you playing free-improv acoustic guitar at that time?

REYNOLDS At that point I was probably doing electric, but that evolved. I did that gig for over ten years. It started out solo electric guitar with effects, and somewhere I started playing sitar and did that for a long time, and then I started playing acoustic.

MATTHEWS Monday night at Millers . . . I remember coming in, it was electric for a while, and then all of a sudden violin, and then all of a sudden cello, and then sitar. And then he'd even play drums for a while—it was cool.

REYNOLDS I learned to play a lot of instruments on this gig. And that kind of led to the acoustic guitar as encompassing all the earlier stuff. I got way into that with the effects.

MATTHEWS And then he'd play a lot of Eastern-sounding scales and weird drums on the guitar.

Tim, did you play more acoustic or electric on the early band albums?

REYNOLDS A lot of acoustic. I'd spend about two months playing acoustic and three days playing electric.

MATTHEWS It was us sitting next to each other, strumming madly. It was so much fun.

REYNOLDS We sat in the studio just like this [moves chair right in front of Matthews] with a glass thing [between us], and that's how we did the whole first record. The band was all on the second floor.

MATTHEWS And then they'd inevitably turn his acoustic guitar way up and mine way down! That's [producer Steve] Lillywhite—I'm not saying whether he was right or wrong, but he'd say [affects British accent], "OK, let's turn David down and Timmy up" [laughs]. I love how with the last album, he said, "David, you don't really feature on this album at all, but don't tell anyone." We'd learn it, we'd all play, and then he'd turn me down.

Were you playing the same parts?

REYNOLDS On the first album we played the same part and then doubled it—like four acoustic guitars playing the same thing.

MATTHEWS And it made it sound really huge.

REYNOLDS I would just overdub a little bit. I did more electric overdubs as the albums went on.

MATTHEWS The last one has a lot more production. We still recorded the rhythm section live—guitar, bass, and drums—but then much more stuff went on top. Oh, put Stick there, piano . . . it doesn't matter if they're not in the band. We had a lot of other people. And Tim taped his face up and played lots of electric overdubs [laughs].

Dave, have you always played exclusively acoustic?

MATTHEWS I never really played electric. Sometimes when I pick one up, I'm surprised. It's amazing how suddenly you're just like [makes wailing rock lead sounds]. Yeah, I know what that feels like now! And then I put it down, and I just sit back down with an acoustic.

What drew you to playing an acoustic in the first place?

MATTHEWS I think in the first place it was a percussive thing. Also it's lighter and there are less things you need with it, so when I was younger and just traveling around, doing a lot of walking, it was always easier to have an acoustic. So I sort of grew attached to how portable it was. And when you're 16 and you can play "Father and Son" by Cat Stevens, [sings] "It's not time to make a change . . ." all of a sudden you're making out.

It's interesting that you've always played an acoustic, because you hardly ever play standard acoustic guitar open-position chords. Instead, you favor closed positions and up-the-neck things that are more typical of electric playing. How did that style evolve?

MATTHEWS I think one of the biggest inspirations was John D'earth. He's a trumpet player and a great teacher as well; he did the string arrangements on the last album. But he once said to me, "Guitarists always write everything in E or A or D." So I started playing as many things as I could that were a half step away.

Do you come up with those closed-position patterns by hunting and pecking?

MATTHEWS A lot of things that I do come out of trying to find circular motions. I'll just go around and around with something—unlike Tim. I think one reason we're complementary is that I can play the same five notes in the same order for an hour and find it absolutely satisfying. And Tim can swim around; I don't know if Tim ever repeats himself. So then the two of us kind of land comfortably together.

One of your signature guitar parts is the staccato "Satellite" riff, which opens up a lot of possibilities for Tim to play more sustained or legato types of things. It's not like playing over a big strum.

REYNOLDS Yeah, exactly. It's clearly different, especially where there are just two guitars. With a band you can come up with a really simple part, because everyone else is laying down a lot of other stuff. But with two acoustic guitars, you have to be more aware of [the other guitar part].

Tim, do you come up with the guitar melodies you play in "Satellite" and other songs when you're jamming?

REYNOLDS I just come up with it in the studio, and Steve, the producer, says, "Stick with that." And that becomes the theme. It becomes part of the song.

MATTHEWS It really does. And people get excited when they hear that. When the band is live and Tim is not with us, I don't think people generally miss things, but people definitely react [when they hear that guitar line]. With "Crash," when they hear the little signature things that Timmy does, the pull-offs and stuff, they go "Yaaaah!" It's almost more familiar than everything else.

REYNOLDS The [duo] thing is like a band. Because we play with bands, we hear a lot more in our heads than what we play. The psychic vibe of a band comes in, and we just lock in like a band.

MATTHEWS Sometimes I'm amazed by how it locks in, really amazed.

Tim, do you ever feel limited when you're using effects with an acoustic guitar?

REYNOLDS No, it's the opposite. I play so much electric guitar that I get my ya-yas out with that, and when I'm playing acoustic, I don't ever feel I need that. I get off on doing both.

I can play acoustic guitar without effects—I practice that way, and I've made records without them, but I like to have more colors. I have lots of records of acoustic guitars, but I don't listen to them as much as I listen to other records that have a lot more sounds. But that's just my own taste, and my tastes always change, so that's only today.

When you're playing with just two guitars, do you find that you play more percussively?

MATTHEWS Yeah. It doesn't come out as much with a band, you know. If I were using one of these [full-body acoustic] guitars, I don't know if it would work. I use a Chet Atkins because it's like [makes sharp sound].

REYNOLDS It's hard for an acoustic to cut through with all the instruments.

How would you compare the whole experience of performing with the band versus the duo?

MATTHEWS I love playing with the band. I really, really love it. But there are more personalities, obviously. . . . There's still the joy, there's still the generosity, but it's more like there's a choreography about it. You have to be more aware of each other, and there's sometimes the threat of falling a little too much into habit.

With Tim, though, it's so intimate, it's like going out for a candlelit dinner, except we're not eating. And I also feel that to a certain degree, if I was to suddenly go [makes jibberish noises], in this environment, Tim would probably laugh. I don't know if it would be an appropriate thing to do with the band. There's a certain looseness about when the two of us are playing that's really beautiful and really different from the band. I feel like this is real precious, you know. The band, I'm amazed how quiet we can get, but Tim and I can get [whispers] real quiet.


Excerpted from a longer interview that appears in Acoustic Guitar August 1999, #80. That issue also contains a transcription of "Crash into Me" as well as a sidebar on Dave Matthews' rhythm guitar style.

http://www.acousticguitar.com/issues/ag80/ag80.shtml



DAVE MATTHEWS and TIM REYNOLDS

The Dave Matthews and Tim Reynolds acoustic tour crew arrives with a truckload of road cases, but it's almost entirely PA and recording gear; the actual stuff used on stage would fit easily into the back of a Honda. At sound check, Matthews' longtime friend and guitar tech Monk Montgomery even apologizes about the simplicity of the stage setup as he walks me through it.

Reynolds plays two Martin D-35s, a '96 and a '93. Both have Martin's standard Fishman pickups, which run into a Morley volume pedal, a Boss digital delay, and then a Countryman direct box. The little Boss stomp box is the source of all of Reynolds' electronic trickery. "There's one backwards mode—it plays infinite, and you can mess with that," Reynolds says. "And there are delay modes that you can go infinite. There are a lot of cool little things."

For these duo shows, Matthews' main ax is a Martin HD-28, also Fishman equipped (the Gold Plus Natural 2) and running straight into a Countryman DI. "Even on the big tours we use Fishman," Montgomery says, "because it's really bright, and the way he plays so hard and a lot of low notes, it's the only thing that really captures the sound." Both Matthews' and Reynolds' guitars are miked (with a B&K 4051-A and an Audio-Technica 4021, respectively), but the signal only goes onto the night's board tape, not to the house. The Matthews crew (as well as fans) are inveterate tapers, and their archives are the source of releases like Live at Luther College and the DMB's Live at Red Rocks.

Matthews' backup six-string is a Lakewood M-32, which has its own integrated AER pickup system. And for a handful of songs—"Wild Horses," "Spoon," and "The Last Stop"—he picks up a Martin D12-28 12-string. (For "The Last Stop," it's tuned down a half step.)

All these guitars are strung with D'Addario lights. No funky tunings, and no capos or other gizmos except for Reynolds' slide. "Sorry, that's it," Montgomery says with a shrug. "I sit in that chair all night."

For band tours, Matthews has long been playing a Gibson Chet Atkins model that has been modified with Fishman electronics and runs through API preamps, Meyer CP-10 EQs, and Eventide harmonizers. The Chet's thin, feedback-free sound, Matthews says, helps to cut through the dense band mix.

—Jeffrey Pepper Rodgers

http://www.acousticguitar.com/issues/ag80/gear80.shtml

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 11/28/2002 :  11:41:45 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
HERE IS A GOLDEN OLDIE, it says the "new CD" is SANCTUARY!!!

TIM REYNOLDS

A master of every conceivable guitar technique-and then some-Reynolds brings a whole new sensibility to his instrument. His unbelievably wide-ranging musical cosmology underlies a diversity that defines his music. From progressive rock, straight-up jazz, and high-powered funk fusion guitar, to bass, piano, sitar, mandolin, violin, and a plethora or ethnic percussion instruments, this self-taught musician rules.

His inspiration comes not so much from other guitarists as from the everyday world and completely unrelated musical styles. "I listen to stuff that's not even related to guitar to get inspiration. For example, I listen to modern industrial noise to hear something and then copy it on my guitar," says Reynolds. He has reached the highest technical level as a guitarist and musician, but it is the spiritual aspect of his music that transcends. Reynolds communes with the guitar in absolute harmony and partnership.

Born in Weisbaden, Germany, the son of a Pentecostal military man, Tim spent much of his childhood moving--from Alaska to St. Louis and through much of the Bible-belt Midwest. As the child of devout, fiercely-conservative parents, Tim's earliest musical introduction began at age 12, playing electric bass before writhing congregations of ecstatic worshippers three times a week (over 1000 times!) until his high school graduation.

Tiring of the constraints of imposed conservatism, young Reynolds secretly plunged into jazz and "forbidden" late '60s and early '70s psychedelic rock. At age 18, he left home to join a group of "experimental" musicians. After absorbing much from them and the dozen other bands (from disco to country) that followed, he eventually settled in Charlottesville, Virginia: a progressive community where Reynolds was given opportunity and space to jam with some of the area's most creative musicians, including Dave Matthews. There he founded "TR3". It was in this environment that Tim Reynolds explored his art, with impromptu performances on sitar, solo jazz guitar, solo djembe, twelve string guitar, violin, and mandolin. Tim's influences, which include Carlos Santana, Jimi Hendrix, Marilyn Manson, Bob Marley, Nine Inch Nails, and Led Zeppelin, among others, are indirectly felt in the fabric of "TR3" and Tim's solo projects.

A guitarist who rises above the mere mastery of chops to a virtual state of communion with his instrument, Tim makes utter use of every capacity the guitar has to create sound--harmonic, melodic, or percussive. With "Sanctuary"--a new CD out, and having recently performed a wildly successful, sold out, national two-man acoustic tour with Dave Matthews, Tim Reynolds stands poised at the threshold of long-awaited and much deserved recognition as one of rock's true guitar maestros.

http://www.wksu.org/folk/festival98/reynolds.html

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 11/29/2002 :  12:03:52 AM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
Dave Matthews and Tim Reynolds

Pantages Theatre, Los Angeles, March 9, 1999

Dave Matthews takes a break from the band.

Dressed in casual clothes, a weary Dave Matthews ambled onto the Pantages Theater stage to the deafening screams of his loyal fans. Following their recent release, the acoustic Live at Luther College, Matthews and longtime friend Tim Reynolds have been touring almost non-stop since mid-January -- and Matthews admitted that he hasn't had much sleep lately.

But Matthews is remarkably adept at pulling himself together at the right moments. Never one to let his fans down, he delivered three hours of mostly original songs, interspersed with long discourses on sleep deprivation, the turkeys around his house, and Jerry Falwell and the Teletubbies.

Relaying the story of his introduction to Reynolds, Matthews recalled being on the patio of a bar and hearing an incredible band playing inside. "I looked in the window," he said, "and it was just this guy."

Reynolds has performed on numerous Dave Matthews Band recordings as a guest musician, but now he practically steals the show on lead acoustic guitar. Utilizing a number of electronic effects, Reynolds at times sounds Flamenco and otherworldly -- a sort of space-age Sabicas.

Musically, Reynolds and Matthews make a distinctly odd couple. Their sound is a major departure from the jams of the Dave Matthews Band, but it is that departure which makes the duo so intriguing. The acoustic, two-guitar setting works most effectively on Matthews' darker songs -- the powerful renditions of "Spoon" and "Satellite" managed to quiet even the most rabid fans. Matthews and Reynolds also delivered fine covers of Bob Dylan's "All Along the Watchtower" and the Rolling Stones' "Wild Horses," which fit snugly between Matthews' own creations.

No doubt many of his fans wondered if Matthews would be able to live up to the reputation of the Dave Matthews Band with a pared-down show like this. He has -- and has pushed his music in a most interesting direction.


KEVIN DELANEY
(March 18,1999)

http://www.rollingstone.com/news/newsarticle.asp?nid=7337

I love Dave's story about his introduction to TR. PRICELESS!!!

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 11/29/2002 :  12:15:14 AM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
I found this while sifting thru the internet. For anyone trying to complete that ever elusive, extensive calender of TR dates, here are a few additions you may not have had.

Tim Reynolds Trio Schedules New Dates
January 17, 1998
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
No DMB news has sprung up today, but here's some information of TR3's revival tour... During the past week, the Tim Reynolds Trio has scheduled new tourdates to fill part of the time once scheduled for the Dave & Tim tour. The tourdates make up a week of concerts in Colorado and Montana; I highly recommend checking out one of TR3's concerts if they're in your area. The band will begin a larger tour of the Northeast U.S. in April. The tourdates (along with phone numbers for ticket info) are as follows:

February 19 The Inferno - Steamboat Springs, CO......(970) 879-5111
February 20 The Inferno - Steamboat Springs, CO......(970) 879-5111
February 21 The Aggie Theatre - Fort Collins, CO*....(970) 407-1322
February 22 The Double Diamond - Aspen, CO...........(970) 920-6905
February 25 Herman's Hideaway - Denver, CO...........(303) 777-2535
February 26 Dillion Dam Brewery - Dillion, CO...........(970) 262-7777
February 27 University of Colorado - Boulder, CO.......(303) 492-7704
February 28 University of Montana - Missoula, MT*..(406) 243-6661

* - Indicates a Tentative Date


http://www.dmbml.com/archives/news/reynolds.html

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 11/29/2002 :  12:16:41 AM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
From the same source as above:

Tim Reynolds Joins the Band in Birmingham, More Appearances Expected
August 19, 1998
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tim Reynolds made his first live guest appearance with the band in over two years Tuesday night during the band's performance in Pelham, AL. Reynolds' band, the creatively-titled Tim Reynolds Trio, was scheduled to play Zydeco's Bar in Birmingham Tuesday night, providing a predictable scenario of the guitarist joining Dave Matthews Band onstage. Tim Reynolds Trio (TR3) is also scheduled to perform in the same cities as DMB in Atlanta, GA on Thursday night and Charlotte, NC on Friday -- look for Reynolds to guest at these concerts as well. Of the seventeen songs played in Pelham, Tim donated his electric guitar skills on eleven songs, including a remarkable, thirteen-minute "Crush." The music from Lynyrd Skynyrd's "Sweet Home Alabama" provided by the band as an intro into "Ants Marching" started off the one-song encore ending the show. A complete setlist of the 8.18.98 Pelham, AL show can be found here.

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 11/29/2002 :  01:40:27 AM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
Tim Reynolds
Matthews' Friend Doing "Solo Thing'
By Curtis Ross of The Tampa Tribune
Published: November 20, 2002

Guitarist Tim Reynolds has ""always kind of done a solo thing.''
He's alone on stage for his current tour, with his guitar, keyboards, drum machines and samples making ""a lot of noise,'' Reynolds says, and taking the place of a band.

But it's his collaborations with a friend which have given him far greater name recognition.

Reynolds has been a frequent contributor to live shows and recordings by the Dave Matthews Band. ""Live at Luther College,'' a 1999 double-disc live set, features the acoustic duo of Matthews and Reynolds.

It's not unusual for the uninformed to attend Reynolds' gigs expecting a vibe like that at a Matthews show.

They're in for a surprise.

""That's why we go to great pains to get press that describes it in accurate terms,'' Reynolds says by cell phone, traveling in a van from Georgia to Florida.

So let it be known that while Reynolds' music doesn't lack for grooves, it draws from … among other things … his background in jazz, his use of electronics and his love of darker, heavier music.

Of late, Reynolds has been absorbing the metallic sonics of bands such as Mudvayne and Meshuggah.

""I got into harder rock because I was doing a lot of nighttime driving,'' says Reynolds, ""just finding what would keep you awake.

""Different styles of music get invigorated over the years,'' Reynolds says. ""In the early '70s there was really good, serious progressive rock and then it all got watered down. Then jazz-fusion became interesting for a while.''

Reynolds grew up in a strict, religious household. His first playing experience took place in church.

""I only played in the church because I couldn't play anywhere else,'' Reynolds says. ""I did it until I graduated from high school and then I ran away and did what I wanted to do.''

Reynolds played in numerous groups, performing music that ranged from experimental to disco to country. Even on his own, he's fond of bouncing from style to style.

Reynolds says has played ""a lot of different styles and when I get tired of one I just go to the next for the different challenge.''

The solo setup allows plenty of room for improvisation but Reynolds isn't a one-man jam band.

""It's very arranged,'' Reynolds says. ""It's definitely songs and arrangements. There's improvising inside of that but it's not like a jam band thing at all, like Nine Inch Nails.

""But there's also reggae and funk,'' Reynolds says. ""It covers a lot of different areas. To me it's just all music. The styles to me are just different ways to order basic structures of a song.''

Reporter Curtis Ross can be reached at (813) 259-7568.

WITH: Peter Prince

WHEN: Today, 8 p.m.

WHERE: Twilight, 1507 E. Seventh Ave., Tampa

TICKETS: $15; (813) 247-6234

About the Event:

Tim Reynolds
11/22/2002
9 p.m.
$10 advance, $15 day of show
Twilight
1507 E. 7th Ave.
Tampa, FL 33605
(813) 247-4225

http://ae.tbo.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=front_music_detail&musicID=2636

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 11/29/2002 :  01:45:59 AM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
Concert with Tim Reynolds
Date: Tuesday, November 12, 2002
Time: 8:00 p.m.
Location: Emens Auditorium
Admission: $ 10.00 B.S.U. students with ID/$15.00



If there were a line between artistry and alchemy, you would most likely find Tim Reynolds balanced on the narrow middle ground concocting what can best be described as a musical potion for those who have developed an immunity to the average auditory venture.

Alternating between the familiar confident plucking he displayed on his sole composition on the 1999 Dave Matthews collaboration Live at Luther College, and a healthy mixture of serene percussive acoustics juxtaposed against some daringly explosive diversions, Reynolds seems to capture an improvisational spirit within the confines of his style and structure.

Attributed with giving Dave Matthews the inspiration to begin writing and ultimately form his own band, Reynolds offers scattered moments throughout this instrumental collection ("Hopeful Heresy") that act as solid cross reference points to where the two men meet in technique. And yet even with this shared stamp in place, Reynolds leaves an indelible mark throughout, placing him among the few, who truly can and consistently do, break free beyond the boundaries of conformity. He will be performing at Emens auditorium Tuesday, November 12.

http://www.bsu.edu/upb/event.asp?event_id=71

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 12/11/2002 :  05:32:31 AM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
Tim Reynolds expresses anti-war viewpoint at Marrz
By Chelsea Marti

When Jason Ruth, general manager for Marrz Theater heard that Tim Reynolds would be in the area on his "Chaos View" tour, he began networking to get the guitar guru to play at Marrz.

"Wilmington has basically been without the ability to bring in such artists as Tim Reynolds," Ruth said. But now that he has Reynolds booked, Ruth said he anticipates anywhere from 500-800 people in attendance for the Nov. 2 show.

Reynolds' appearance at Marrz Theatre downtown will be in continuation of his tour. His newest album, Chaos View, was released this past September.
With his musical influences ranging from Marilyn Manson to Alice in Chains, and most recently to the Deftones and Fear Factory, Reynolds is on a constant search for an original sound. As a guitar connoisseur, Reynolds' has played with numerous artists and bands, including Greg Howard, OM Trio (who recently played at Paleo Sun), Shannon Worrell and the Stix and Stones.

The majority of music fans, however, recognize Reynolds for his previous collaborations with Dave Matthews. Reynolds lived in Charlottesville, VA, for 17 years, where Matthews also resides. The two met at a club that Reynolds frequently played and became friends.

In 1999 Reynolds and Matthews went on tour together, and a live album, Live at Luther College, documented this venture. This is the album that finally seemed to push Tim Reynolds into the spotlight. But Reynolds is much more than a star. According to him, it's not about fame. He is about leaving someone inspired by his sounds, even if for one fleeting moment.

Also according to Reynolds, collaboration with Dave Matthews has given him much appreciated exposure. But he is an artist who does not stick with one genre. Reynolds asserts that he hopes fans will not attend his shows in anticipation of hearing Dave Matthews Band-like music. He considers it disrespectful to "copy" a person's musical sound.

"People might expect one thing and get another thing," Reynolds said from his Santa Fe, N.M. home.

Reynolds strives to push musical boundaries and is constantly trying new things, improvising as he goes. His "Chaos View" tour is most definitely something new for Reynolds. The show will be a multimedia presentation, with Reynolds playing mostly electric guitar sprinkled with acoustic guitar, drum programming and sequence and sampling.

"Chaos View" will be presenting more than Reynolds' guitar capabilities. His very evident views on politics and social justice issues will be represented through flashing fractal images, ranging from 'outer space' imagery to militarism and propaganda. Reynolds will be "jamming out," as he says, in front of the presentation. The flashing presentation idea was something his wife thought of, and it has evolved into a very important asset to the "Chaos View" tour. Reynolds hopes to express his anti-war view through the photographs and images presented throughout this tour.

His sentiments about politics and war have evolved since he's had his own children. "Don't kill people because it makes them want to kill you," Reynolds said.

Doors open at 9 p.m. and the show starts at 10:30 p.m. Tickets cost $12 in advance or $15 at the door, and can be obtained at Schoolkids Records, Manifest Discs and Tapes or at the Marrz box office.

http://www.theseahawk.org/news/311099.html

The Seahawk Wilmington NC
The Student Newspaper of UNC Wilmington

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 12/11/2002 :  05:35:44 AM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
Face | Out from Dave's Shadow
Acoustic musician Tim Reynolds comes to rock out Ball State tonight at Emens Auditorium.


by Lindsay Hurni, Features Editor
November 12, 2002



There's a long-standing joke between Tim Reynolds and his fans and friends on the East Coast that he's an acoustic musician, much like his longtime friend Dave Matthews.

"I can't really play that game of just doing something that my friend does really well," Reynolds said in a recent phone interview. "Because you know, there's tribute bands, but to me that's all just a rip off. And I'd rather spend my energy and what money I make on all of that on doing something original because really that's the best way to return the opportunity..."

When it comes time to perform, Reynolds puts his music where his heart is -- in heavy metal. But in the past few years of having played on the earlier Dave Matthews Band albums and live in concert, he seems to have found a steady mix between the two.

"It's a means to express myself in different ways," Reynolds said. "And so I usually go for a couple of years and make money on acoustic and then go out on electric guitar and just lose it."

Reynolds admits that he's even lost a college audience before due to the stigma placed on him from his work with Matthews. He said it was expecting acoustic, but got the other of Reynolds' two modes instead.

"It doesn't make it right or wrong, it just makes whether or not I want to base my career on being popular and doing what everybody else wants or just doing what I want," he said. "You've got to kind of go in between."

The audience can expect just that tonight. As one of the only college stops on his Chaos View tour, Reynolds has combined his views on social injustice and war in to a one-man show. Along with prerecorded drum machines, Reynolds uses imagery, video footage and animation to reflect his anti-war message.

"It's funny, I've had a band for years and then started playing solo for a couple of years acoustic, but now that I've figured out how to teach the drum machines how to play...I'm just diggin' it," Reynolds said. "I've kind of got so used to playing solo that it doesn't really matter what I'm going to do."

But for Reynolds, his heavy metal makes it easy for some to categorize in a collective way. Because of the distortion guitar, Reynolds said it's limiting because he also includes reggae and funk.

"It's all like rock and roll to me, but I guess since I'm 45 my idea of what is rock and roll is a little spread out," he said.

Reynolds doesn't fear piracy, in fact, of his seven solo albums, two have been released over the Internet. There's no harm done for the man who has yet to sign with a major record label by choice, but he said most musicians including Matthews, have benefited from it.

"Music comes from nowhere and goes to nowhere and in a way it's given to the musicians for free," he said. "Other than all the hard work they do ... I can see both sides, but I also think it's kind of crazy. We're all people on the same planet and in a way nobody owns anything. We're all born into whatever we think we own and when we die, we don't own nothing."

He's not trying to make it big, he said. Born in Germany, Reynolds now calls Santa Fe, N.M., his home. He got his taste of stardom working with Matthews, he said, and now he's doing it for the love of music.

"Whatever mode it is," he said. "In general if somebody finds one moment of escape or relief or release in one bit of any song that I have, that is a fulfillment for me ... That's what I get out of music that's the most important thing."

http://www.bsudailynews.com/vnews/display.v/ART/2002/11/12/3dd0ac9548ea9
Ball State Daily News

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 01/14/2003 :  02:51:25 AM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
So I posted the new ACOUSTIC tour dates on nancies.org and the next day there was a front page announcement about the tour. How NICE!! Thanks Waldo!!! Anyway, there was a link to an interview by Waldo for their site. Here is its:

Interview with Tim Reynolds
By Waldo Jaquith
Nov.22.2000

Guitarist Tim Reynolds is somewhat of a mystery to most DMB fans. Though he was once a name recognized only by the most hard core fans, 1998's "Live at Luther College" made him a household name. He's contributed to every DMB release, performed dozens of intimate concerts with Dave Matthews and even appeared on VH1's "Storytellers" with Dave.

Tim Reynolds, to some fans, is simply a guitar virtuoso. To others, he's the guy that that brings out the sensitive side of Dave. And to some others, he's the sixth member of Dave Matthews Band. Perhaps the most common question, as posed by a fan on #dmb recently, is this: Why doesn't he speak? But that's not the real question. That's just the only way that people know to express it. The real question is this: Who the hell is this guy?


. . .


The story is oft-repeated. Tim Reynolds was born in Wiesbaden, Germany, and began playing electric bass at age 12 for his Pentecostal congregation. He played regularly for the church until he left high school, when he started to flirt with psychedelic rock and jazz. He found his way to Charlottesville, by which time he'd picked up sitar, drums and guitar. He became a regular performer at Miller's (the downtown bar featured prominently in every story of DMB) where he met Dave Matthews. The two got along well, and ended up spending time recording in Dave's mother's basement, munching on marijuana brownies and playing whatever came into their heads.

Fast-forward about a decade. Dave and Tim have performed as a duo dozens of times, in three separate tours. Their album, Live at Luther College, has sold bazillions of copies. Tim has contributed heavily to every DMB album, and has become known as the unofficial member of DMB. Tim, in this time, has released nearly a dozen of his own albums in this time, both solo and with his rock band, TR3. Just in the past year or two, Tim has become known as a musician in his own right among DMB fans, selling out shows all over the U.S.

Tim's solo career is on an upswing. He's been playing colleges across the country, and has been very well received. Although there were once stories of people showing up demanding that he play Dave Matthews Band songs, or expecting to have Dave walk out on stage, that hasn't been a problem recently. The inclusion of Tim's song "Stream" on Luther College gave listeners a taste for what to expect from him.


. . .


Tim is on the other end of the telephone, at his home in New Mexico, his voice raspy and quiet. What does he think about DMB fans showing up just to see him play "Stream"?

"People are realizing," he explains, "that I have other songs that are similar enough that they can come to see a guy going apeshit on guitar. It seems like people have gotten quieter, listening more for what it is, instead of expecting something."

His frantic, intricate, near-perfect guitar technique requires a Zen-like approach to performing. "The whole approach to music is internal. With Greg [Howard], or with Mike [Sokolowski], it's a lot of improvising. It just comes from nowhere. It's like light or something. You don't know what the origin of it is. It's something that you tap into. Once you're in the flow of it, it pretty much plays you. It's like meditating, relaxing. There's instances of concentration...the rest of the time, you try not to think. It gets in the way of the process. Even when I play a piece of classical music, it's on automatic. I have to go from A to B."

Does he feel that he's influenced others, even changed the manner in which musicians view the guitar?

"Only just the few people that I've met and that have me sign their guitar. I don't really see myself being like that."

If Tim hasn't yet made an impact on the guitar world, it seems a near-certainty that he will. Tim lists his strongest influences as 70's guitar players, though those that have seen his over-the-top rock performances with his band, TR3, may disagree. Perhaps something more along the lines of Alice Cooper or Trent Reznor. He's even appeared on stage wearing just a diaper, to the horror of college kids expecting to hear "Ants Marching." Does he push the edge just to scare some of the frat boys that show up?

"Not necessarily trying to scare away the frat boys, but deliberately trying to do something different that I like. This is something that I really, really like to do. When bands like Nine Inch Nails and Marilyn Manson started to get popular, I really dug it. Not because of the shock value, but because it was 70's rock again. Trent Reznor was able to reinvent rock & roll all over again. The same way that Hendrix refigured what the guitar could do...Marilyn Manson was kind of a modern political Alice Cooper, even singing like him. I've always had a trio to kind of do stuff like that."

Surprisingly, Tim is not signed to a label. He's had a few offers, but most of them wanted to make an "acoustic pop record with guests." He's just not interested. Given his changing stylistic interests, Tim isn't excited at the prospect of anybody telling him what style of music he's going to play when, or what his albums are going to sound like. "You've got to sell fifty million copies to get the money back that they invested in you. I respect the music business, but I'm trying to do my own thing, and you really give it up for the labels, because they're going to take it and do what they want. I'm all about independence. I just rebel against shit like this."

Contrast this with Dave Matthews Band. They're signed to RCA Records, they've dropped Steve Lillywhite for pop producer Glen Ballard, and they've even started booking their shows through the much-maligned SFX. And it appears that their new album will, for the first time, have no guests. Surprisingly, not even Tim was asked to contribute. Isn't this a little odd?

"I think it's really cool. Anybody who has a band, you really want to show people what you can do by yourself, that's totally legitimate. I think that's really cool. It gives me fucking breathing room to tour, to write...it's given me time to do my own thing. I haven't really talked to Dave since we toured in '99. You know, they probably just, maybe -- in the same way that I go out and people come expecting to see a Dave thing or think that we're connected at the hip -- in the same way, maybe they have the same kind of technology in reverse. I can totally see it. I think they could do fuckin' great with any producer. [Lillywhite's] definitely got the science down. But he definitely wants control. Maybe they wanted to strip it down."

DMB isn't the only one with a new album coming out soon. Around the same time, Tim's new disc (the working title is Nomadic Wavelength) will come out. He recorded it in the spring after getting off tour. Prior to that spring, Tim hadn't written any new material for a while, making solo performances discouraging. But after this tour, he was ready to record. He laid down seventeen solo, acoustic songs. Twelve of them are straight Tim, no effects or other instruments. A couple more of them use looping, a couple others are "soundscapes," and the remaining song employs percussion. He hasn't mixed the album down yet, and there's no artwork, but he's plainly pleased with what he's accomplished so far.

He hasn't announced plans for what comes between the upcoming end of his tour and the release of his new album. This lull, combined with DMB's similarly-scheduled time off, begs an answer from Tim to the obvious question: Will there be a Dave & Tim tour this winter?

"Not that I know of."

Tim explains that he's heard rumors that there will be a tour, and he's also heard rumors that they'll never tour again. But he's also heard rumors that he and Leroi died in a car accident, he explains, so he's not inclined to trust rumors.


. . .


The lack of a Dave & Tim tour, although disappointing, isn't all bad. Both Dave Matthews Band and Tim Reynolds have new albums coming out within a few months, and both still have some shows left this year. If you live in the southwest, you can catch Tim in the first week of December. And if you live in the northeast, you can see Dave Matthews Band at any of a dozen shows.

But if you want to see both at once? Well, don't hold your breath.

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 01/27/2003 :  8:36:04 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
Tim Reynolds' power trio doesn't sound anything like Dave Matthews

Friday, October 15, 1999

By Scott Mervis, Weekend Editor, Post-Gazette

Let's say I'm a guy (OK, or a girl) who really likes the Dave Matthews Band, Counting Crows, that kind of stuff? Will I walk out of Graffiti tonight when Tim Reynolds starts playing?

"Probably," Reynolds says and he laughs.

"If they come expecting anything like that, they shouldn't even come 'cause it's so not like it. Unless they're wide open.

"Fans of the Dave Matthews Band know Tim Reynolds as the behind-the-scenes, sixth member of the group. He's supplied the lead guitar work on all the Dave Matthews Band records, has toured with them on occasion and provides some amazing acoustic playing to the duo of Dave Matthews/Tim Reynolds, as heard on the two-disc set "Live at Luther College.

"But when he isn't with Matthews, Reynolds is fronting TR3, also known jokingly as Puke Matrix. Right now, he's on the road, promoting "Astral Projections," a newly released, independent CD that sounds like Ozzy fronting a dark funk band.

"It's a power trio. Hendrix's Band of Gypsies is what this is modeled after," Reynolds says. "It's Band of Gypsies through Nine Inch Nails and everything in between. We do some jamming, but not in the sense of the Grateful Dead or the Spin Doctors or anything like that. It's coming from a totally different area. The rhythm section has a lot more soul, a black-rock fusion thing."

Reynolds, an Army brat born in Germany whose strict Christian parents once limited his playing to the church, has been fronting a variety of bands for the past 15 years. His fortune turned when he was leading a loose-knit Monday night gig at a club in Charlottesville, Va., where Matthews was tending bar.

He and Matthews -- a happy-go-lucky guy who used to serve the musicians until 4 in the morning -- struck up a bond and started jamming together.

"When we first met," Reynolds says, "we recorded all kinds of things that were hard rock but have since been destroyed. We were doing something similar to what industrial music is now. We'd just get all high and have fun."

But they were also playing together as an acoustic duo, and a lot of that organic sound was incorporated into what the Dave Matthews Band put on record. Reynolds chose not to become a regular member of the DMB partly because of the rigorous touring schedule, and partly because "I had my own band going, and I was into playing a variety of styles. This is just the kind of music I didn't get to explore in my earlier studies. I'm rocking out a lot harder."

By having his own band and hanging out with Matthews on the side -- "just don't ask about the gay sex that we have," he jokes -- he gets to go back and forth between different worlds, while not having to worry much about his bank account.

"I just really dig contrast. I'm sitting in this hotel looking out on this town right now," he says from New Haven. "But I live in the country, in Santa Fe, and when I look out I can see 100 miles in every direction. It's great to have contrast -- the contrast of playing acoustic tours, and the contrast of playing this hard rock with strobe lights and all.

"It may not be easy for the people who like Dave Matthews music to assimilate, they should be able to dig it. Most people nowadays aren't hung up on just one style...," he says, then stops himself. "Well, maybe they are. But there are a lot of people who aren't. And that's the kind of people I'm going for."


http://www.post-gazette.com/magazine/19991015reynolds6.asp

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 01/27/2003 :  8:39:03 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
Thanx to Pollstar for the mention, but count the number of errors in this small piece about TR. Boy, someones needs to educate them both about TR and Greg Howard. GH a fellow guitar wiz?

Guitarist Tim Reynolds Goes It Alone

Updated 07:05 PDT Sun, Sep 30 2001

Guitar virtuoso Tim Reynolds shares his talents with audiences at clubs, theatres and colleges during the next two months. His tour kicks off October 1 in San Francisco and runs through November 17 in Chattanooga, Tenn.
Fellow guitar wiz Greg Howard joins Reynolds October 16 - November 10 (except on the 31st).
Although Reynolds has been regarded by critics and musicians alike as one of the most talented guitarists to emerge in the last decade, it wasn't until his collaboration with the Dave Matthews Band that the public caught on and pushed him into the limelight. He has guested on all of DMB's albums and joined them on a number of global tours.
In 1999, Reynolds and a solo Matthews teamed up for a sold-out acoustic tour. The result was a two disc set, Live At Luther College.
In addition to his guitar skills, Reynolds has also mastered jazz guitar, bass, piano, sitar, mandolin, violin, and a variety of ethnic percussion instruments. Starting his musical career at age 12, Reynolds is one of the few to whom the term "prodigy" actually applies.
Earlier this year, Reynolds was touring the States with his band TR3 in support of his Nomadic Wavelength album, which was released in May.


http://www.pollstar.com/news/viewnews.pl?NewsID=1350

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 01/27/2003 :  8:41:09 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
October 5, 2001

Reynolds' rap:
Dave Matthews' sidekick stays solo
By LEWIS TAYLOR
The Register-Guard



TIM REYNOLDS may be calling his latest tour a "solo acoustic" outing, but you can expect to hear more than just a man and his guitar when he comes to the WOW Hall tonight.

"I just like to beef up the sonic palette a bit," Reynolds said, speaking by telephone from Southern California.

Along with six-string and 12-string guitars, Reynolds is traveling with a 12-string baritone and an electric guitar. Touring in support of his latest album, "Nomadic Wavelength," he's also packing a sampler filled with snippets of conga drums, double basses, timpani and other instruments. Only recently did Reynolds begin experimenting with a sampler.

"They've been around for years, but I'm the typical dumb guitarist who has refused to jump into it," Reynolds said. "It's a way I can incorporate some of the things that I do without dragging a lot of stuff around."

Replicating the sounds of a band without actually having to be in a band is a dream come true for Reynolds, who is still best known as the guy from the Dave Matthews Band who was never really in the Dave Matthews Band.

He has toured with the DMB, recorded an album with Matthews (1998's "Live at Luther College") and contributed to nearly every one of the group's albums, but he's never officially joined the group.

Reynolds met Matthews at Miller's bar in Charlottesville, Va. Matthews was the bartender and Reynolds played weekly gigs.

"When they (the DMB) started, I already had my own band," Reynolds said. "I told him (Dave Matthews), `I've got a band and I kind of like the way it is. You should start your band.' I could see that he needed to do his own thing."

Reynolds doesn't take any credit for Matthews' eventual success, and he doesn't seem to harbor any resentment toward the multi-platinum-selling rock star. Although he still works part time with his own world-beat band, TR3, Reynolds is happy to go it alone.

"Being in a band is like raising a family and being a dad," Reynolds said. "Realizing that I didn't need to do that ... it was liberating."Reynolds (who is a dad, by the way) may have foregone membership in one of the most successful touring bands on the planet, but his affiliation with Matthews hasn't hurt his career any. After years of toiling in relative obscurity in Charlottesville clubs, his music is reaching new audiences.


Independently, Reynolds has released six solo albums and four records with his band. He has entertained offers from major record labels, but he has declined them all.

"I've given lots of thought to it, but every time I got close to it, I found it was just too constricting," Reynolds said. "I'm just a guy who likes to be way more loose about my stuff. ... I'm a lone wing nut."

Reynolds' lone-wing-nut approach has led him down some strange musical paths. Raised by a conservative and devoutly religious military family, he played the bass in a Pentecostal church band for six years starting at age 12. By the time he graduated from high school, he had begun to explore jazz and psychedelic rock - much to his parents' chagrin. Strangely though, it was reggae music that first convinced him to become a professional musician.

"When I first heard reggae, I thought it sounded like a bunch of drunk people who couldn't play," Reynolds said. "Then I came to realize that it was so spiritual and so pure and simplistic, and that there was some music in there."

As Reynolds bopped around from Midwestern band to Midwestern band, he incorporated reggae standards into his repertoire. But his musical experimentation didn't stop there. He taught himself to play the guitar, piano, sitar, mandolin, violin and a number of different percussive instruments, and he immersed himself in everything from disco to country.

After a misguided attempt to join the Air Force, Reynolds moved to Charlottesville and put aside his musical ambitions to work in the toy department of the local Kmart. The plan was to settle down and raise a family."

I was so tired of being in the Midwest," Reynolds said. "I loved Charlottesville. I remember just thinking it was one of the most exotic places in the world."

Instead of focusing on settling down, Reynolds immersed himself in the local jazz scene. He teamed up with saxophonist Michael Brecker, met guitarist John Abercrombie and played with John Dearth, Bruce Hornsby's trumpet player.

The musical bug had bitten Reynolds once again, and his sonic explorations this time were just as varied as they had been during his first bout with musical fever. Along with jazz, he explored world music in his newly formed trio, TR3, and even found himself at one point playing in a country-western band called Southern Love.

"Because we were so awful, it freed me up to not really care whether it was good or bad," Reynolds said. "In a way, being in the worst band possible was kind of the best thing for me."

Now living in Santa Fe, N.M., Reynolds seems primed to come out from the shadow of Dave Matthews. DMB's latest album, "Everyday," was the first record not to feature Reynolds, who says he has more than enough on his own plate to keep him busy. His latest release is an ambitious, 17-song CD that covers a broad musical landscape ranging from free jazz to funk to electronica.

He's also begun releasing experimental compositions over the Internet. "Id," a new, Internet-only album, is available for free at Reynolds' Web site (www.TimReynolds.com), and he has more experimental releases on the way.

"I figure if I'm putting out all of this music on my own, I can just make it available for people who want it," Reynolds said. "I would feel guilty selling this stuff, though. ... I'm kind of just creating an outlet for the neurotic schizophrenic that I am."

Recently, Reynolds started down a new musical path, which seems just as unusual as some of his earlier sojourns. His latest love is metal, specifically modern metal acts such as the Peoria, Ill., band Mudvayne. The obsession doesn't seem to be dying down.

"I think it's just like eating a hamburger or something," Reynolds said, explaining his metal affliction. "Music is food, and meat is a real simple analogy to metal."

Metal probably will not take over Reynolds' music entirely, and you probably won't have to worry about today's show turning into a headbanger's ball. But don't expect Reynolds to play any songs by the Dave Matthews Band, either. Out of respect to Matthews (and to himself), he's made it a rule not to cover any DMB tunes in concert - even though he knows people will ask.

"I don't get annoyed anymore, because it's happened so many times," Reynolds said. "It's just the way people are.

"Entertainment reporter Lewis Taylor can be reached by phone at 338-2512 and by e-mail at ltaylor@guardnet.com.
TIM REYNOLDSWHAT: Solo acoustic guitar
WHEN: 8:30 p.m. today
WHERE: WOW Hall, 291 W. Eighth Ave.
TICKETS: $12 in advance, $14 at the door


http://www.registerguard.com/news/20011005/tk.reynolds.1005.html

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 01/27/2003 :  9:03:38 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
The follow-up review:

Gone Solo
Tim Reynolds discusses his career without Dave Matthews Band

By Lycia Shrum
November 14, 2001


JohnLivas, The Battalion

From reluctantly playing the piano at age 8 to becoming a skilled guitarist, Tim's ability to play the acoustic guitar continues to amaze his listeners time and time again. Although the piano is where his affair with music began, it certainly is not where it ended.

"Playing the piano just helped me with my form when it came to music. But I've known guitar was my thing. I was playing guitar before I knew I was actually playing guitar," Reynolds said.

Best known for his work with the Dave Matthews Band, Reynolds also has a successful solo career and a successful career with his band Puke Matrix, formally known as TR3. Touring now to promote his recent CD, Nomadic Wavelength, Reynolds has been able to enjoy the feeling of performing solo.

Reynolds said because he is getting older and has a family of his own, he feels it is harder to be involved with a band because it is like having another family. He said the time needed for a band is a lot more than what is needed to have a solo career, and it also does not provide him with as much freedom.

"It's different when working with a band compared to doing solo work," Reynolds said. "I'm able to be in charge of everything and do exactly what I want to do without having to make sure all the others are on the same page as me."

Many people only associate Reynolds with the acoustic guitar, but he is not limited simply to this instrument. With Reynolds' mastermind at work behind every aspect of his music, the possibilities are endless. Reynolds said he has been tampering with more electronic aspects in his music.

"Some people don't consider electronically-made music to be actual music, but it is," Reynolds said. "You're the one fitting the sound into the music and making it work. New technologies are being used to bomb countries, so why not use them to make music and make people happy?"

Reynolds also plays the mandolin, sitar, violin and djembe. He said he is able to combine the sounds of these instruments to create the sound of an entire band made solely by him, his guitar and the altered sounds he is able to create with it.

"Although I have the guitar under my belt, there's still things I'm learning to do with it," he said. "I still have fun discovering new ways to manipulate the sounds from a guitar. It's like music on a sonic level."

Two of the bands Reynolds said he admires, along with many others, are Marilyn Manson and Nine Inch Nails.

"I think Trent Reznor is an amazing guitar player. Their sounds are so raw and aggressive," Reynolds said.

Reynolds said his next CD to be released, titled Petroglyph, will be all electric guitar. Reynolds said that most people are surprised to know that there is a heavier side to his musical taste.

Along with working on a new CD, Reynolds has also released a double album in MP3 format, which is available over the Internet for free. Reynolds said he feels that by putting this album out on the Internet, it will have an aspect of spontaneity to it and a lot of improvisation.

"I have access to the Internet, and I want to use it," he said. "I think it really gives a loose approach to music. It's like the whole time the music is there; it's just a matter of figuring it out and expressing it. And when I did, I didn't go back and alter it. It's completely raw."

http://www.thebatt.com/vnews/display.v/ART/2001/11/14/3bf206e2323b5?in_archive=1

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

KevinLesko
Alien Abductee

3712 Posts

Posted - 01/28/2003 :  03:09:45 AM  Show Profile  Send KevinLesko an AOL message
here is the amazon.com review of Chaos View:

Such is the clout of Dave Matthews that even the most minor of his Charlottesville, Virginia, brethren are lifted to prominence. Witness the left-field success of Tim Reynolds, a frequent DMB live supporter and a fellow folkie who shared the stage with Matthews on the recording of Live at Luther College. Despite the obvious connections, Reynolds gingerly sidesteps DMB's lilting acoustic rock on Chaos View, instead favoring intricate electronic effects and lyrics steeped in politics and post-millennial uncertainty. His sonic experiments work best on tracks like "Radar Contact" and "Skeleton Walls"--angular, ethereal songs that are refreshingly free of corporate focus-pocus. --Aidin Vaziri

god
Kevin
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 02/08/2003 :  9:49:05 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
NICE!! (except for that "fellow folkie" remark. HEHE)

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 03/02/2003 :  12:54:38 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
Tim times two
Guitarist Tim Reynolds is more than a Dave Matthews sideman

By Matt Sebastian, Camera Music Writer
February 28, 2003

WHO • Tim Reynolds, with Greg Howard
WHEN • 9 p.m. Saturday
WHERE • Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder
TICKETS •
$14
CALL • (303) 447-1545



Tim Reynolds has two kinds of fans — those who know him as a wildly eclectic guitar virtuoso and those who just see him as that guy who jams with Dave Matthews.

The dual roles don't seem to bother the affable Reynolds, even if some of his more casual listeners find themselves shocked by the acoustic guitarist's occasional multimedia, quasi-industrial stage shows.

"I just go out there and do what I want to do," Reynolds says from his home just outside Santa Fe, N.M. "People just have to figure that out. You can't satisfy everybody — and you shouldn't try to."

Reynolds, who'll perform at the Fox Theatre on Saturday, seems to delight in mixing it up musically.

Last year, he took his one-man electric band on tour, a trek that yielded the live album Chaos View, recorded at the Fox last April. Lately, Reynolds says, he's been playing gigs around New Mexico with a local reggae act.

And now he's off on a five-date solo acoustic tour of Colorado, a short jaunt to prep him for the big show — a 21/2-week run of dates performing as a duo with Matthews throughout the eastern United States.

"Everything you do always enriches everything else you do," explains Reynolds, who professes an affinity for everyone from Nine Inch Nails to Bob Marley. "That's why I like to dabble in different styles."

Reynolds' most recent studio album, 2001's Nomadic Wavelength, is a collection of nimble, almost classical acoustic guitar instrumentals. It's a stark contrast from the electric guitars and programmed beats that fill out Chaos View's tales of doom and Armageddon.

Both of those sides of Reynolds' musical personality will be on display later this spring, when he goes back on the road with a split acoustic/electric show following the tour with Matthews.

Born in Germany to a military family, Reynolds spent his youth moving across the country, settling in Missouri, Alaska and Kansas along the way. As a child he began playing piano, then bass, before moving over to guitar, often playing to church crowds and at schools.

Reynolds' curiosity led him to jazz, funk and Middle Eastern sounds and even Latin music, all of which would later inform his dexterous acoustic and electric guitar playing.

In the mid-1980s, Reynolds formed an electric power trio, TR3, while living in Charlottesville, Va., and landed a regular slot at a local watering hole. The tavern's bartender, it turned out, was a friendly South African fellow named Dave Matthews. The two quickly struck up a friendship and began playing together.

As Matthews' career took off in the mid-'90s, he brought Reynolds along for the ride; the guitarist has guested on most of the Dave Matthews Band's records, toured with the hugely successful act and released an album — Live at Luther College — documenting one of his acoustic tours with Matthews.

"I just love playing with Dave," Reynolds says. "He's a really nice person and he's got such great songs. Even though we've played them so many times, there's still a lot of improvising. It's a lot of fun."

The duo's collaboration won't end with the upcoming tour, which has been in the works since before the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. There are plans to possibly release another joint live album, and Reynolds recently spent a week in Seattle recording tracks for a studio record with Matthews that won't be released under the Dave Matthews Band moniker.

"It's going to be really, really good," Reynolds says of the secretive project. "I don't want to let the cat out of the bag, but I can tell you, it's gonna kick (butt). People will be surprised to hear Dave in a fresh new way."

Contact Matt Sebastian at (303) 473-1498 or sebastianm@dailycamera.com.

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Erich
Fluffy-Esque

USA
1427 Posts

Posted - 08/11/2003 :  4:06:26 PM  Show Profile  Send Erich an AOL message
Dave Matthews and Tim Reynolds - Wood and Steel
by John Rhodes
Dave Matthews is one of the most accomplished singer/songwriters in the world, and Tim Reynolds is one of our most admired guitar virtuosos. On March 22nd, the diverse paths of these two long-time friends will once again cross, when they share a magical evening of acoustic guitar with their fans, at Radio City Music Hall.
Recently, we had a chance to talk with Reynolds about his music, his life, and the durable musical relationship between these two great performers.

HL: How did you and Dave Matthews meet?

TR: I was playing at this place in Charlottesville, Virginia, called Miller’s. It was kind of an eclectic folk club, you know. They had jazz and bluegrass nights, rock ’n’ roll and whatever. My band [TR3] kind of started there, and I settled into playing there on Monday nights for about 10 years. When Dave first started working at Miller’s as a bartender, he was such a charismatic person that you couldn’t help but, you know, kind of hang out. He was a musical person and we shared a lot of reference points, like rock ’n’ roll and working in bars. We immediately hit it off as if we were old high school friends.

HL: What was he like at the time?

TR: He was already established on the local scene as a serious actor, and though I didn’t really get out to see Dave’s acting that much, I remember seeing a film of one of his plays and it was amazing. He was acting, but not acting, you know. He was very natural. If he’d get back into acting, he’d be pretty far out. But you know the music business: When you’re doing that big scene thing it takes a lot of time. It’s like a 24/7, 365-days-a-year job. That’s kind of why I opt to stay down under the big screen radar. I’m too neurotic to deal with all that.

HL: How did the two of you start playing music together?

TR: We used to go to Dave’s house, and mess around on four-track recording stuff in his basement, and just kind of go crazy. It was never meant to be anybody’s CD; it was just for fun. We even did a rap-metal version of “Amazing Grace,” not exactly the same lyrics [laughs]. And then, we did a few things that were pretty cool, like basic rock ’n’ roll that you wouldn’t remotely associate with Dave Matthews as you know him today. But we never really put it together as a band, because I kind of had a band going for several years, and we weren’t really looking to add a vocalist. But obviously Dave had the talent that called for a band of his own. So, initially, Dave would just sort of come and hang out, and do some gigs, and sing along on a few songs.

Then a friend of ours, John D’Earth, a local jazz luminary, and a very great spirit in the musical scene in Charlottesville, put together a big Broadway-style show that featured a woman singer. At the end of the show, he thought it would be great to have Dave sing a song. When Dave came out and sang his simple song, it just overshadowed anything else that was supposed to be happening. Everybody got up and started clapping, and Dave was just smiling really big. That was a really charismatic moment. The next thing I knew, the guys (who eventually became Dave’s managers) were calling people around town saying “Let’s get together and put a band behind this guy.” And as you can see, they did it pretty brilliantly. You couldn’t even get into the club where they were playing on Tuesdays. It was just all girls, packed! At the time, I was raising a family and so I said to myself, “I’m not going to get involved in a scene like that. I’m going to stay home, and do my Monday night gig.”

HL: But you continued to play and record with the Dave Matthews Band, even though you stayed home and didn’t really tour heavily with them or TR3?

TR: Well, mostly I just played on the records. I didn’t really do gigs consistently with the band. I just jammed with them a few times up until maybe 1995, and the Red Rocks title. I’m on that record because I was touring with my band, and we had a couple of days off. I went to jam with Dave on a couple of songs and wound up playing on the whole CD. That’s when I started doing these acoustic gigs with Dave—once every couple of months. We did a few in Charlottesville, then one up in D.C. Then we got one to do a concert in New York. This was all while Dave’s band was touring all over the world and kind of building up DMB. Most of the time, I was just sitting at home doing my music, raising my family, and occasionally I would go and do one of these high-profile gigs with Dave. Those acoustic gigs got more popular, so we did our first acoustic tour. That’s when Live at Luther’s was recorded.

HL: Your recent solo work on Chaos View seems to have expanded from a kind of acoustic, ethnic/world jazz to include some more intense, electronic sounds. Was this transition a result of playing with Matthews and his band?

TR: In a way it’s kind of a funny opposite. When I started doing more professional acoustic work with Dave, I really got more into heavy music. I had time to sit around and listen to music that I hadn’t had time to check out before. I also ended up doing a lot of late-night drives, and I found that the more intense music would keep me more awake, and I kind of got a taste for it. It was something I liked in the early ’70s—Jimmy Paige, Jimi Hendricks, and Duane Allman—and then I kind of got away from it. I skipped over Judas Priest, and all that, and went right to Nine Inch Nails [laughs].

An Acoustic Evening With Dave Matthews and Tim Reynolds is on national tour from March 19th to April 5th.

~pw'oikr
~( ">
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 08/11/2003 :  4:14:20 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
Thanx Erich, that was very interesting. Some of that I had never heard TR talk about. That is a really good story to link when the every-so-popular question of how did TR and Dave meet gets asked. Here's the answer, straight from the horses mouth. Now I don't have to give the story second-hand the way I heard it, which is exactly the same, but I don't tell it nearly as well and certainly not with all the GREAT detail. hehe

Where is that from? Is Wood & Steel a magazine? I am not familiar. Thanx again for posting it. Very informative.

Hey zachmozack, did you check out this link yet?

http://www.timreynolds.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=1079

You may also find it quite informative based on your comments above.

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Erich
Fluffy-Esque

USA
1427 Posts

Posted - 08/11/2003 :  4:43:26 PM  Show Profile  Send Erich an AOL message
hey fluffy :) it was from a radio city program that was for March / April. they gave it out at the t+d shows and at the tori shows i was at, so i snagged one

~pw'oikr
~( ">
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 08/11/2003 :  4:47:11 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
Does it have picture of T&D on the cover? At one point I was contacted by RCMH for photos of TR to use for the program and/or advertising. They were pretty picky about what they wanted and didn't like to hear that what they wanted TR was not very good at hehe. I ended up sending them a bunch and asked them to send me a copy when it was finished. As per usual, I never heard back and I don't know if they ended up using any of my photos or not. I asked them to just give me a photo credit if they used anything. Just curious if they did.

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Zachmozach
Fluffy-Esque

USA
1534 Posts

Posted - 08/11/2003 :  6:39:55 PM  Show Profile
Thanks for the link fluffy it was sweet! I always wondered if Tim had ever read Effortless Mastery by Kenny Werner (I think). I recently read it and it was great. It talked about playing in a meditative state and gives meditation exercises to do with it. That totally reminded me of Tim because I remember reading that he said he goes into a trance like state when he plays. It also talks a lot about practicing and to experiment. Such as a lot of musicians limit themselves to playing in keys and Kenny talks about just playing freely and letting your fingers do the playing. It all has almost buddist type of influences and is a must read for any musician and in fact everyone. If Tim hasn't read it I guarantee he'll totally dig it.

Go to Top of Page

Erich
Fluffy-Esque

USA
1427 Posts

Posted - 08/11/2003 :  6:51:33 PM  Show Profile  Send Erich an AOL message
definatly Zach. Heres what he had to say about ID, which is very similar to that:

This whole id project, and it's follow ups, are all supposed to be under the moniker of No One. Obviously, anyone will know who it is, but as a side project with a seperate agenda, or at least a different approach, it helps to make a seperate distinction. It is kind of like an oriental form of painting, where the painter goes into a trance and paints a picture in one untouched flurry of paint strokes. No touch ups or fixing; I read about this concept recently and it gave me inspiration to go on with an approach I have intuitively adopted sometimes as a general thing. It's from a book called Art & Physics. I quote:

"This unconcern for linear time is particularly evident in the Japanese art form sumi-e. Using only rice paper, black ink, and a brush, the artist places himself in an almost trancelike, ever-present now and paints in a rapid flurry of strokes. There can be no touching up, erasing, or revising. Sumi-e, flowing from the artists hand, is the very embodiment of the Eastern concept of time."

So I guess No One is the cheap western guitar wanker equivilent of the Japanese art form called sumi-e. You can quote me there if ya like. Instead of paper, black ink , and a brush, it's keyboard/drum machine/guitar. At that point in the book they are comparing western modern physics' concept of time with the Eastern concept of the same, and how modern painters, as well as not so modern Japanese painters, actually created the visual equivilent before the scientists had the idea formulated completely. Anyway, I am digressing insanely-----

~pw'oikr
~( ">
Go to Top of Page

Zachmozach
Fluffy-Esque

USA
1534 Posts

Posted - 08/11/2003 :  7:57:45 PM  Show Profile
The mind is capable of amazing things, like I heard that Kenny Werner the guy who wrote the book can listen to a song and play it back perfectly (he plays piano). I have also read Mozart heard an opera I believe when he was younger and then he wanted a score of the music and this being in the days before they really printed music there really wasn't a way to obtain one so he just remembered how it went and wrote it out himself with no mistakes of course. I read that in Mozart's brain and the fighter pilot. Both books I've mentioned have great exercises for the brain which really work. I wonder if tim can play stuff back like that at least to some extent. I really believe that controlling your brain is the crucial skill needed to master an instrument or anything for that matter. It is however a time consuming and life long project. Kenny said when he first started to study music in this way his teacher made him play only one or two notes over and over letting his hands drop on the keys in a relaxed state. However she would only let him practice ten minutes a day. In two weeks of doing this he finally had to play a song or something for someone and he said his improvement was remarkable. kenny also talks about playing high such as the bop musicians on heroin and how they would feel total freedom in playing. That is why it doesn't surprise me at all Tim might use the ganja a bit before playing because it really lets you get into the music. However I am a praticioner of this routine myself and I feel that it really makes the music seem new each time although eventually it is hard to not find yourself trying to get back into this state that you were in one time while playing high that blew all others away. However I have found that you can't ever re-enter that exact state. Although if you get into meditative trance playing you may always re-enter. Smoking some grass may just be the easy way there but I don't think it takes you all the way there. My advice is to always try to reach that space where you can do no wrong as you play almost like your just sitting there watching your fingers play not thinking and not concerned whether or not you're sounding good(almost impossble for most players). When we let go of all fear and just stay in the moment the music inside each of us will come out. Hope this all made sense to you guys and I hope you will all read Effortless Mastery as it describes this sort of thing much better than I. Forget the self play the music Peace.

Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 09/25/2003 :  4:01:45 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
Guitarist eschews popularity

Before you go, get this clear from the get-go. When Tim Reynolds performs Tuesday at 8 p.m. at Edinboro University, you won't hear Dave Matthews' songs.

Sure, Reynolds appears on six Dave Matthews Band albums. He does tours with Matthews, including one that played a sold-out Warner Theatre in January 1997.

Reynolds also logs substantial playing time on "Some Devil," Matthews' first solo CD, which will be released Tuesday.

Truth is, Reynolds could have joined Dave Matthews Band a long time ago. But that role would be too limiting for this adventurous free spirit.

"Since the mid-'80s, I've been writing music and playing and having bands and doing my own thing," Reynolds said. "But I didn't necessarily do it to become a star at it. Sometimes people try to do that, and it becomes a side effect of what they do. I try to avoid pitfalls like that."

Reynolds writes to express himself, not to please anyone else. So, he's gloriously, unrepentantly eclectic. Inspired as much by world music and jazz as classic rock, he doesn't settle for one genre.

He's churned out intricate acoustic music ("Nomadic Wavelength"), noisy industrial rock ("Chaos View"), trippy fare ("Gossip of the Neurons") and explosive funk ("Astral Projection"). To hear him is to understand how he can like such disparate artists as Nine Inch Nails, Marilyn Manson, Carlos Santana, Jimi Hendrix, Led Zeppelin, and Django Reinhardt.

Much of his work is instrumental, yet Reynolds has plenty to say. He's a pacifist who believes men will learn to stop controlling each other, work in harmony, and give up materialism.

"We think we're like the center of the universe, and it's the opposite," he said. "We're just beginning to know the universe; it knows more than us. We've got to reverse the paradigm of our thinking. The rules we've got now are stuck in medieval times."

In Edinboro, Reynolds will have no rules. He'll do acoustic, play electric, show short films and generally freak out. He's also gearing up for — gasp — another tour with Matthews. Reynolds said he'll likely tour with Matthews and Trey Anastasio (who's also on "Some Devil") later in 2003. He's excited about Matthews' new CD.

"It's interesting to hear Dave without the sax and violins. I enjoyed it. The songs were great; some of his best ones are on there. And the sparseness of the production is pretty cool."

"Some Devil" will sell like the devil. Reynolds' never will and though he's a brilliant guitarist, he gets little recognition. Rolling Stone didn't include him in its list of 100 greatest guitarists. No problem.

"You have to kind of work to get popular in certain ways," he said. "I kind of work to stay out of that."

Tickets for Reynolds are $15. Call 732-2177.

DAVE RICHARDS can be reached at 870-1703 or by e-mail at dave.richards@timesnews.com.


Last changed: September 10. 2003 3:57PM

http://goerie.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20030919/LIFESTYLES06/109190277

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 09/06/2004 :  12:37:56 AM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
here's a copy of the story on Tim Reynolds as it appeared in teh on-line version of Friday's Santa Barbara News-Press. This is a great one, lots of references to TR's influences, even something I didn't know before about Joe Pass. I knew TR was a big fan, but I did not know he considered him his "first idol in that solo performance world. With him, it's all about the flow. He knows all the technical stuff, but that's not where he's coming from." Along with Bob Marley of course. VERY INTERESTING!

PS:By the way there is one mistake, the new CD is called "Parallel Universe" NOT Parallel View.

Santa Barbara News-Press, 8-13-04

OUT FROM THE SHADOWS:
TIM REYNOLDS SHIFTS INTO SOLO ACOUSTIC GUITAR MODE

TIM REYNOLDS
When: 8 p.m. Sunday
Where: SOhO, upstairs at 1221 State St.
Cost: $12 with dinner, $15 for show only
Information: 962-7776

By Josef Woodard
NEWS-PRESS CORRESPONDENT

Tim Reynolds may not be a household name, but the guitarist has entered vast numbers of households as well as the mainstream music world as a sometimes right-hand guitarist with Dave Matthews. Like many a musician whose best-known work is as a supportive team player, a different private persona is lurking. That more personal side of Reynolds involves life as an eclectic and technically adroit player, who sometimes works in the genre of instrumental steel string acoustic guitar.

Local audiences will get a close-up exposure of that side of Reynolds when a short California tour brings him to SOhO on Sunday night. Reynolds is following up his last-released album, "Chaos View" with a double-CD called "Parallel View," to be released this fall. Expect to hear music from that project as well as his unique spin on covers like The Beatles' classic "All You Need Is Love."

Before heading into the studio for a day's work to finish his new project, Reynolds was interviewed by phone from his home in Santa Fe, N.M. This is a manic time, as he jumps from a professional studio to his low-fi home studio, chasing and trapping ideas.

"It always happens right before I go out on tour," Reynolds comments. "I get these urges to do a bunch of extra home recordings, which makes me fried. It's like the ant that can't stop to find the next piece of rock to put in the hole."

This scurrying will result in an album consisting of one polished studio disc and one "bonus disc" of humbler home studio experiments made over the past couple of years. "Since I can afford to do it," he says, "I'm just going to make a bonus CD. I don't have to worry about a record company OKing it."

One advantage of releasing music on your own label is the freedom from having to answer to label brass. "I've always done stuff on my own," Reynolds says. "I just can't quite make that leap of faith to the big-label scene. But I respect record companies, because all the records I have are on somebody's label. I guess because of working with Dave Matthews, who is on a label, I can reap the benefits. It's his gig and it's a sideman gig for me, there's not so much invested. It's not like this thing that I'm worried about how it's going to turn out."

Playing the guitar became an obsession and an emotional release early on for the mostly self-taught Reynolds. He was born in Germany and raised in various American towns, an itinerant military brat whose parents were rigorously conservative Pentecostal Christians. After playing music under the aegis of the church, Reynolds followed his wildly diverse instincts, into jazz, experimental music, rock and friendly musical gray areas.

While living in Charlottesville, Va. in the 1980s, Reynolds led an electric trio called TR3. It was at a regular gig in a local club that he met Matthews, then a bartender. A musical bond was forged. Fast forward to the '90s, as Matthews' own music found a rapidly expanding following and career momentum. Reynolds was naturally folded into the Matthews' musical world. He has guested with the Dave Matthews Band over the years, including a show at the Arlington Theatre, and also recently teamed up in acoustic duo format with Matthews.

Through it all, Reynolds has maintained an unusually open-minded view of music. "I just got back from Ozzfest with my children," he says. "We all had big fun. There's a whole thing about rocking out that's just awesome. But then also, the acoustic guitar can have a similar aesthetic. This is rock 'n' roll to me. Old acoustic rock rocks like nobody's business, like Elvis Presley with the brushes and acoustic bass and him on acoustic guitar. It's rocking, man."

Reynolds will be rocking, solo acoustic-wise, on his California tour. The format is partly attractive because, as he says, "the logistics of that are so easy," but there's a much deeper and more musical attraction. "I love drum machines and everything else, but I also love the idea of a guy standing up there with an acoustic guitar. That's a whole different vibe. A song is like a place, if it's a good song. You go somewhere. I've always enjoyed that about music.

"I like hearing guys who can play a lot of licks, but the real musicians are the ones who create a space where you are taken somewhere. It has nothing to do with playing a lick. It's just emotive. It's like the old-school Indian music, music that just draws you in."

In fact, Reynolds' rambling musical background has prepared him for a life all over the map, stylistically. After focusing mainly on electric guitar for many years, he found himself "immersed in ethnic music" in the late '80s and early '90s, playing sitar and violin, which he says "drew me back into the wholeness of acoustic guitar. When it's a solo instrument, you have to be more aware of the architecture of the music."

Although his acoustic work puts him squarely into the realm of celebrated acoustic players like Leo Kottke and Michael Hedges, Reynolds points to other influences. Back in Charlottesville, he remembers hearing Pierre Bensusan, Duck Baker, Tuck Andress and especially the late, great Joe Pass, who mastered the art of solo jazz guitar. Pass was Reynolds' "first idol in that solo performance world. With him, it's all about the flow. He knows all the technical stuff, but that's not where he's coming from."

But Reynolds' own music resists easy categorization, as much rock and folk as jazz and world music-influenced in nature. He has a grand view of that diverse approach, spilling over into his extra-musical idealism. "Artists are showing us the way to break down the walls of prejudice. Music is the best example of how people can love something so much, but not kill each other over it. Most people who like different kinds of music will stop short of fighting over it. It should be a good lesson in all things."

These days, Reynolds is busy trying to find a workable balance between life as a sideman and as a manically creative solo artist. He appeared on Matthews' solo album last year and was on the road with his old friend, on the "Dave and Friends" tour.

"I maintain a connection with them," Reynolds says, "but it's not full time. I like to do my own thing and I don't really want it to be a big, big thing. I like to keep it right on the edge of the radar," he says with a laugh, "not above it.

"I'm kind of a private person. I like to go play and I like to be a little famous, but I wouldn't want the commitment of being really famous. It's time consuming, when I just like to make music and see what it sounds like. If it's good, I go to the next thing."

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 09/24/2004 :  5:23:00 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
Tim Reynolds talks Rock N' Roll
By Sean Corbett
Published: Thursday, September 23, 2004



(The entire, uncut interview will be posted Monday, september 27, 2004)
For three or four years I have been fully intrigued by a man I heard on a live Dave Matthews CD. He played an acoustic guitar song called "Stream". I initially thought for sure that there were at least two people playing this song because the combination of strumming and finger picking together at such high speeds was jaw dropping.

It was months later that I discovered that a man named Tim Reynolds, just barely above five feet tall, single-handedly played this song and hundreds more like it. I went on to discover he is a master of the violin, sitar, drums, drum machine, bass, keyboard, electric guitar, acoustic guitar and is rumored to have been seen playing hard rock on the harp in the '80s.

Under his belt are seven independently produced solo records with four more on the way in the next year, one solo DVD, countless records in collaboration with other solo artists, six or more records in collaboration with the Dave Matthews Band, thousands of solo tour dates, thousands of Dave Matthews Band dates, thousands of Dave Matthews and Tim Reynolds dates and over a hundred Dave Matthews and Friends tour dates.

Tim Reynolds though is not a member of the Dave Matthews Band nor is he signed with any record label. He lives in New Mexico with his college-aged son and elementary school-aged daughter Eura (who is featured singing on some of his records).

His solo shows are few and sporadic; those who are able to attend are changed forever. He chooses only small venues for himself, with the desire to create a reality with his emotional instrumental music that speaks volumes to themes such as politics, death, love, happiness and spirituality. He has been called by many the "Mad Scientist of the Guitar."

After being fortunate enough to step into the green room at Harper's Ferry in Boston, Mass., I was able to talk to Reynolds about his music, career, and future ventures.



Sean Corbett: Where did you learn to play, and how did you pick this instrument over any other?

Tim Reynolds: Mostly in the bedroom. It picked me. Yeah, I mean, generally that's where you...do it.

Now, I know that you're interested in all string instruments. Which one is you favorite, or is that obvious?

Well, the guitar is, because I'm, like, so familiar with it, but I like playing the sitar. I don't have one anymore, but I've had one for years. I like how I was able to flow with it. ...I usually record with drums and base (referencing a type of recording that uses a drum machine and a base sound effect).

This is the question I have wanted to ask ever since I bought my first Tim Reynolds CD years ago. How do you name your songs [that have] no vocals?

It's just some songs are like that, and some I think about. It just depends. It's really different for every song. Some are like a story in my mind, and I just relate it to what that incident feels like and writing it. You know, some are political, even though they don't have lyrics, but just my thought.

It's almost like you're speaking through your instrument, it's really something to hear. I think that's what makes you most intriguing.

That's hopefully the thing that happens ultimately. Otherwise it's not really worth [it]; it's just human error for no reason, but it's got to have something going on, you know? It's like you try to invest it with all this meaning as it were, and if you get one second of that, then it's all right.

What do you think about you, well, your name at least, being so attached to Dave Matthews?

It's very fortunate that I'm able to financially support myself enough through that, which is what I do most of the time. So it's good in that respect, you know?

And what about being introduced to people as "Dave Matthews' Collaborator" like you were tonight?

Well, it's inevitable, really, because that's what's going to pour me into big arenas, and that's why I like to take a step back from full-time big arenas. And with the tight following, you know, that's fine. I can just make the music how I want for better or for worse, and it's not that I don't appreciate people who go the other way (big arenas all the time) because that's a science and a giving that's beyond human capacity.

Your ideal gig. Would it be with Dave Matthews in a big arena? Would it be Dave and Friends? Would it be a small show like tonight where the big entrance is you walk from the bar to the stage, and instantly people start sitting around you, instead of requesting Dave Matthews songs?

The ideal gig is any of those that is just a good gig. Like tonight was an ideal gig because it was just simply a good gig. It depends on all the factors. The expression of doing a solo show, though, is just naked, so when that's really good, it's the most good. Tonight I was able to create the illusion of a band with the pre-recorded drum machine and bass. And to create that reality is just...awesome.



The ideal gig is any of those that is just a good gig. Like tonight was an ideal gig because it was just simply a good gig. It depends on all the factors. The expression of doing a solo show, though, is just naked, so when that's really good, it's the most good. Tonight I was able to create the illusion of a band with the prerecorded drum machine and bass. And to create that reality is just...awesome.


http://www.fairfieldmirror.com/news/2004/09/23/Entertainment/Tim-Reynolds.Talks.Rock.N.Roll-728216.shtml?page=1

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 10/16/2004 :  05:10:14 AM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
Good Times Issue #7 Oct 8-21, 2004
Portland, ME

Standing alone on a modest stage, Tim Reynolds let loose a cosmic flow of strings into the air no other can duplicate. With an acoustic guitar in hand, Reynolds played to a small but energetic audience a number of well-crafted songs that have put him in a class of his own.

Regarded as one of the true masters of his instrument, Reynolds alternated between his 12- and six-string guitars and created a mix of soft acoustic resonance and flashes of true experimental intensity. With the use of delay and looping effects, Reynolds built an orchestra of hypnotic chord progressions that had many in the crowd swaying their heads to the rhythm of the sound. A barrage of influences from jazz, blues, rock and fusion could be heard as Reynolds’ skillful knowledge of the fretboard was the center of attention.

Best known for his performances and recordings with The Dave Matthews Band, Reynolds takes on his own personality while playing solo. A sometimes quiet and reserved artist, Reynolds started off his first set singing, “The media is a weapon of mass destruction.”

This was the second stop on an 11-show northeastern tour. Reynolds played a number of songs in support of his highly anticipated release Parallel Universe, including “Dreaming,” the second track on the double CD.

“The new album consists of a lot of polished songs and some songs that are just going for it,” said Reynolds. A crowd favorite, “Stream,” found on the popular Dave Matthews and Tim Reynolds: Live at Luther College album, brought many smiles to the stage.

“It’s great having songs people recognize, but I’ll never be a major rock star,” Reynolds stated. Interwoven into his original material, Reynolds played a number of cover songs including “Ohio” by Neil Young, and “Come Together” and “All We Need Is Love” by the Beatles.

Though the turnout was surprisingly small, Reynolds played an impressive set that left none disappointed. Dressed in his usual casual style – jeans and a t-shirt – Reynolds thanked the audience and left the stage to continue his night recording at a privately owned studio in downtown Portland.

Tim already has plans for after the current tour: “I’m going back into the studio to make some great versions of old songs for a new album.”

--Nick Kimble

http://www.goodtimesmag.com/Maine%20GT/Maine007/sounds007.jpg

SPECIAL THANX to SandyCarl for transcribing this from the original!!

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 04/05/2005 :  2:08:57 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
Posted on Fri, Apr. 01, 2005 Ft Worth Star-Telegram



It's Tim -- not to be confused with that jam-band guy


By Malcolm Mayhew

Star-Telegram Staff Writer


If you're looking for tickets to Tim Reynolds' show at the Aardvark on Front Gate Tickets' Web site, you won't find them under "R" or "T."

Try "D," as in Dave Matthews.

Those familiar with Reynolds' work know that it can stand on its own. The Germany-born military brat is a masterful guitarist who has built a solid cult following on the strength of his acoustic and electric mingling of jazz, folk, rock and psychedelia.

But to the casual fan, he may always be known as a Matthews collaborator, which is both a badge of honor and a slight burden. Matthews, who has invited Reynolds to play on every Dave Matthews Band record and who released a collaborative effort, Live at Luther College, with Reynolds in 1999, helped get his name out there. At the same time, Reynolds has had a hard time shaking the Matthews-sidekick tag.

"Most people do know me from my association with Dave Matthews," says Reynolds, who has lived in New Mexico since 1997. "Which means most people know me for acoustic stuff. But I've been making electric CDs for many years. A lot of people are surprised when they come out to the shows and hear me play electric. But that's good -- I like to surprise people."

Next month, Reynolds, 47, will unveil another surprise: a two-CD set. The first disc, Parallel Universe, is made up of the acoustic music longtime fans have come to expect from Reynolds. The second disc, Invisible Pagan Underdogs, as its name would imply, gets a little wild and weird, he says.

"The first disc is the main focus," he says. "It has a lot of vocals. It's more polished. The second is a home recording. It's more far-out, but also very pretty. It's sort of a bonus disc, like a he-can-do-this-too kinda thing."

Although he's thankful to Matthews for continuing to call him back for concerts, Reynolds says he prefers the simplicity of his tours.

"I use a minivan," he says. "I got a guy that drives and a guy that manages things. Then I have some guitars with me, and that's it. Touring with Dave is an amazingly regulated thing. You have food every day at a certain time. Everything is scheduled. What I do seems more down-to-earth, more realistic, less mechanized. But they do get better food."

Tim Reynolds

8 p.m. Tuesday

Aardvark

Fort Worth

$15-$18

(888) 512-SHOW

http://www.dfw.com/mld/dfw/entertainment/nightlife/11277752.htm

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 01/20/2006 :  12:50:51 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
Behind-the-scenes star set to rock Legends
Dave Matthews Band accompanist Tim Reynolds has a unique brand of music
By: Bob Costa
Issue date: 1/20/06 Section: Scene

Around the residence halls of Notre Dame, the music of Tim Reynolds is constantly heard as one strolls through the cluttered hallways where posters of Fox's "The O.C." and the music of Dave Matthews are ubiquitous. Yet, most students don't always pick up on who's playing the ingenious chord progressions heard behind Matthews' famously staccato rhythm guitar. Although he's often times in the background of live shows and recordings of Matthews, Reynolds is as integral to DMB's unique sound as the vibe of "Ants Marching" and "Crash Into Me."

Reynolds, who played with Matthews on their multi-platinum 1999 live acoustic album "Live at Luther College," is well-known for being the jam-rock's star's longtime collaborator and guitar virtuoso. He's played on almost every Dave Matthews Band album and toured as an acoustic duo with Matthews numerous times to sold-out theaters across the country, but also built a stellar solo career.

Legends will be hosting one of Reynolds' first tour stops of his winter 2006 solo tour, which will also include shows in Chicago and at college bars near schools like Penn State and the University of Dayton. Starting Saturday at 10 p.m., the show, which is free for all Notre Dame and Saint Mary's students, will profile one of the guitar masters of the nineties and perhaps all time.

A longtime resident of Charlottesville, Va., Reynolds moved to Santa Fe, New Mexico in 1997, after nearly 17 years in Virginia. Though he's content in New Mexico, he said that doesn't mean he won't move again.

"I could easily say that I could stay here forever, or leave after some time," Reynolds said. "Like anything in life, there is a progression. State to state, place to place, eventually country to country, planet to planet, universe to universe, maybe even a big bang. It's all a journey, as long as you make sure you don't let your consciousness get snuffed out."

Reynolds recently released "Parallel Universe," a two-CD album packed with eclectic forays into industrial rock and pulsating acoustic melodies. Featuring songs like the free-flowing acoustic melody "This Is How Much I Love You" and the brittle but pounding "Mercury Direct," it is a meshing of different styles and different sounds that brings together the best of his style while playing with Matthews with his own unique cultivation of sound.

"When you create an album, you're more into the music," Reynolds said. "The two CDs on the new album are a collection of home recordings that have been kind of sitting around for awhile. It's a bunch of tunes that I've really liked listening to. In a way, 'Parallel Universe' is all over the map, just like life is all over the map. I mainly use the guitar but also things like drum machines and other sonic elements so there is much contrast."

The new album lies partly between his previous electric guitar-based album "Chaos View" from 2002 and his noteworthy 1993 solo debut "Stream."

"I guess in the last five years I've been exploring the use of drum machines," Reynolds said. "I kind of got into the programming aspect of things and working on representing all aspects of sound. But now, I'm really focusing back on the acoustic guitar itself and exploring how many different ways I can represent a song."

For Reynolds, the album was a lot of fun with to experiment with different parts of studio production.

"It was full of different things, in a way like old-school Genesis and Steely Dan. It's stripped down in a way, but also features sounds from nature, even the voice of my daughter, Eura."

Such home-grown songs and personal creation, especially with the lack of a major-label's input, has allowed Reynolds to put a sense of warmth and intimacy on many of his tunes as he takes them in so many directions that listeners lose track of the normal verse-chorus-verse paradigm.

During the past few years Reynolds has spent most of his time professionally performing with his own band, TR3, and with Dave Matthews' solo project - which is often referred to as "Dave Matthews & Friends." Matthews, Reynolds, Trey Anastasio of Phish, Brady Blade and Tony Hall toured together in 2003 and 2004 to much critical acclaim, playing long, eclectic concerts covering everything from rare Dave Matthews Band songs to the Beatles.

Reynolds' career began and flourished in Charlottesville, where he was a burgeoning guitarist in the early nineties. By 1993, Reynolds was often playing acoustic sets at numerous local venues with his friend and local bartender Matthews. At that time, Reynolds was much more well-known in the region for his musicianship and Matthews thrived off playing sets with the enigmatic virtuoso. Matthews still fronted his own band, Dave Matthews Band, but spent much time with Reynolds as he honed his own distinctive guitar sound.

As the grassroots following for Dave Matthews Band became an undeniable phenomenon, Reynolds began to carve out a role within that band that he would stick to for the rest of his career. Rather than joining DMB as a full-fledged member, Reynolds decided to help the band during their recordings and on-tour, but still have his focus on his solo work and TR3.

"My music is scattered energy; I like to rock out on the acoustic, reinvent the music, play the fast blues, and cover classics," Reynolds said. "During the last couple of years I've done an acoustic set with a half-hour on drum machine. I'm now exploring more on the twelve-string. Back in the seventies, I first owned a twelve-string. It was simple, and then I had all this apparatus to play with. So now, I just want to challenge myself to learn more high-energy acoustic."

Notre Dame fans will be able to see just how different a Tim Reynolds show can be. Don't expect Dave Matthews, but you'll definitely be in for a night of experimental songs and beloved covers to rock out with.

From The Observer:

http://www.ndsmcobserver.com/home/index.cfm?event=displayArticle&uStory_id=5a624989-43a5-442d-ab7e-8879d60e8193

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 01/24/2006 :  1:18:35 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
(Follow-up Review of Notre Dame show:)

Legendary Guitar Master
Huge crowd greets Dave Matthews Band collaborator Tim Reynolds for campus show
By: Bob Costa

Hundreds gathered outside Legends, Notre Dame's campus bar and club, to see Tim Reynolds, the master guitarist and frequent collaborator with jam-rock king Dave Matthews. The line stretched nearly to Notre Dame stadium, leaving many fans to wonder if they'd even have a chance to get inside to watch the free show.

For those who saw the performance, it was undeniably one of the most unconventional and rousing performances Legends has seen this year. The venue, which is usually hosts top up-and-coming alternative acts and popular student bands, was, for one night, home to an amazingly talented and somewhat frantic musician in total control of both his audience and his sound.

Reynolds played for over 110 minutes, with a simple stage set-up and without an opening band. He walked onto stage just after 10 p.m. to the roar of close to 800 students packed into every possible part of the venue. Clad entirely in black, the rocker was engulfed by rowdy students screaming "Timmy!" just like they would be if they were at a huge outdoor concert, even through Reynolds was extremely close to everyone in the audience.

Overall, Reynolds was in good spirits and exuded that dark yet witty personality that initially shocks the audience but eventually gets them laughing right along. Reynolds took some time before the show to stroll around campus, see the Golden Dome, and do an interview with ND-TV.

Although he had spent part of his childhood in the Midwest, this was Reynolds first time to Notre Dame. Some hardcore "Tim" fans were in attendance, but others who came had only heard of him through his work on the multi-platinum 1999 live acoustic album "Live at Luther College" that he had recorded with his longtime friend, Dave Matthews.

A stellar solo artist in his own right with a career spanning over twenty years, Reynolds dabbled in a diverse array of songs for his Legends set. Originals, covers, and jams were all major parts of his performance.

Although in recent years Reynolds has used the electric guitar during his tours, for his Legends show, one of the first his winter 2006 solo tour, he stuck to the same six-string acoustic guitar for the entire show. Many of the tunes off the set-list came from his recently self-released studio album "Parallel Universe." It was interesting for many in the audience to see how Reynolds broke down some of his more complex studio tracks into live acoustic medleys that meandered up and down the fret board at Reynold's whim.

The performance began with a solo instrumental on the acoustic where Reynolds utilized his pedals for different effects that gave his sound an immediate multi-layered dynamic. Even though the performance was entirely solo, at times the sonic reverberations from the pedals and Reynolds' guitar overlays made it sound like there were perhaps three other guitarists on-stage with him.

Two early highlights were "Hug" and "Che," as well as an acoustic experiment on "Mercury Direct," the first song off the second disc "Invisible Pagan Underdogs" on "Parallel Universe." Some other examples of Reynolds reworking his older tunes came mid-set, when he started to jam into "It's Dead," a track off his 1997 studio album "Sanctuary."

The Legends crowd also loved it when Reynolds played Beatles covers during the middle of his show. From a high-energy rendition of "Come Together" to a phenomenal interpretation of "Here Comes the Sun," it was evident that Reynolds was a fan of the Fab Four.

Reynolds then hit on another classic cover, this time Led Zeppelin's "Whole Lotta Love," which he warped into a menacing acoustic groove that pushed and prodded the normal chords while fans tried to keep up and sing-a-long.

Calls from the audience for Reynolds to play "Stream," the popular song he wrote and performed on "Live at Luther College" with Matthews, led Reynolds to remark "It's coming, first the foreplay, then the penetration," much to the delight of the already buzzed crowd.

The most hilarious moment came when Reynolds began to say the most absurd things that were highly comical as well. Before playing James Brown's "Cold Sweat" and the politically-charged "Indoctrinate," based off the lectures of Noam Chomsky, Reynolds told the audience "My name is Barbara Streisand and I like to smoke weed."

The first encore featured a raucous sing-a-long of The Beatles' famous song "All You Need Is Love," where Reynolds aptly filled the role of George Harrison while the Notre Dame students took on the challenge of imitating Lennon and McCartney for the vocals. That cover segued back and forth with the punctuated riffs "Kundalini Bonfire," an underappreciated gem off Reynolds' 1996 release "Gossip of the Neurons." Reynolds interspersed his own acoustic noodling with another classic next, this time Led Zeppelin's "When the Levee Breaks."

The evening came to an end when Reynolds, without any notice, promptly put down his instrument, gave a peace-sign, and disappeared behind the black curtain.

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 02/10/2006 :  1:53:47 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
Sweet Tea & Sympathy
November 8th, 2005

So TypePad has finally become usable again and I actually have time to post. It's a strange coincidence. I drove up to Milledgeville on Saturday afternoon to take in the last few acts on the Sweetwater Festival bill. About halfway there I realized I forgot my camera, so you'll just have to imagine everything in your mind instead.

The stage was on Hancock Street in downtown Milledgeville, right by city hall, and it was a beautiful afternoon when I got there. After a few false starts in trying to find an ATM that would cooperate (stupid new debit card) I found my way over to the stage where Billy Joe Shaver was playing.

He was playing "Honky Tonk Heroes" when I walked up. Some random and possibly intoxicated gentleman was yelling at everyone to sit their <insert bodypart here> down in the middle of the street, but no one was listening. Billy Joe was kicking it old school just like he did back at Bragg Jam, doing his outlaw country thing.

He's just so darn likable onstage, doing a capella ditties about women who done him wrong or even singing that "if you ain't drinkin' water, you oughter" in that Texas twang of his. "Most of my songs were written trying to get back into my house," he said at one point.

I think he would make for an awesome grandad, with all the stories he could tell about Waylon Jennings and Nashville and getting saved and all. Plus he's great fun onstage-- can you imagine what he's like around the house? He did a few more numbers like "I'm Just an Old Chunk of Coal" and an uplifting anthem that went "if at first you can't succeed, try, try again." I then decided that Billy Joe is secretly a country & western motivational speaker.

After about an hour's wait, during which I made some phone calls and listened to the BBQ contest winners, Tim Reynolds hit the stage. Now, other than knowing he had some kind of Dave Matthews connection, I really didn't know anything about the guy. He came out dressed in black, wielding a 12-string guitar and wearing these insane white sunglasses. I mean, he could've hiked glaciers in these things.

Anyhow, he had a serious effects pedal setup and a very percussive style. There was a heavy delay/reverb going on to the point where he would play one passage, and while it repeated he'd add another layer to it. Kind of like do-it-yourself counterpoint. The effect was like Ani DiFranco gone experimental.

But he didn't stick with that style. In fact, Tim is something of an acoustic guitar virtuoso, and he veered all over the musical map. Sometimes he had a jazz-funk thing going on. Sometimes he sounded like a one-man jam band. Sometimes he'd take a more bluegrass/traditional direction. Most of the time he did not sing, but his voice was a peculiar overlay to the whole experience. It's like Randy Newton mated with a Fraggle.

At one point he did this crazy robot dance and the music was getting pretty intense and I thought maybe people in the crowd would think it was too out-there, but they totally didn't. I could picture the Doozers working futilely to it. It was like a Casio keyboard from the mid-80s gone berserk. As a side note, I used to have a hot pink one, and I would set it to record and I'd madly mash as many keys as I could. Then I'd play it back and put the tempo as fast as it would go. Result: berserk computer noises.

If at any point I got bored or annoyed with Tim's performance, he'd change it up posthaste, so my feelings did not last long. I preferred his more wacked-out stuff and off-kilter arrangements to the straight-up stuff. Also, heavy application of Led Zeppelin, CSNY and the Beatles never hurts. He did trippy renditions of "Kashmir," "Four Dead in Ohio," "All You Need is Love," and
Whole Lotta Love." There was also a bit about the government being a propaganda machine. Seeing that he supported Dennis Kucinich in the presidential election is somehow not surprising. But it was an entertaining, varied set.

I'd heard about the Legendary J.C.'s for a while now, mainly in the form of "you really need to see this band." They are a soul combo from Orlando that does their own music and manages not to sound like a wedding band or bunch of ripoffs. They have a horn section and a keyboard (longtime readers of AMPED will recognize that I am a fan of these instruments) and a frontman who's part soul singer, part revival preacher.

They did a rocking soul revue that got everyone (including me) dancing like fools. I grew up in Florida, about an hour and a half from Orlando, and I had no idea the city of the Mouse contained so much soul. I am kind of obsessed with 60s soul music right now so this was totally up my alley. Frontman Eugene even played the bongos at one point, and he's all over the stage with the awesome dancing antics. 

Their set was kinetic, insistent and totally fun. They come to Macon fairly regularly so I would recommend catching them if possible. I wanted them to play longer, actually.Karl Denson's Tiny Universe was also a lot of fun, though they were more in a funk/jazz vein. Karl is quite the saxman and he has a lovely, restrained jazz vocal style as well. I was very impressed with his band. They had great structure but also the kind of openness you need to get that spacey thing going on.

They definitely had some P-Funk going on, some Hendrix, a touch of Sun Ra and a large helping of Sly and the Family Stone. At one point there was a drum fill that I would've sworn was in that Bell Biv DeVoe song "Poison." Karl also pulled out the jazz flute and even made good use of the cowbell.

There were some slow jams, some deep funk and some space explorations but mostly all of it was danceable, which I liked. He used to play with Lenny Kravitz, back when Lenny was more of a hippie, and on Saturday night he took us all to Funky Town.

All told the Sweetwater Festival had a great bill and is worth the trek up Highway 49.

Posted by Maggie on November 8, 2005 at 05:16 PM

Maggie Large is the Telegraph's entertainment writer.

http://blogs.macon.com/amped/2005/11/sweet_tea_and_s.html

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 02/27/2006 :  04:25:08 AM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
Posted a new interview with TR on the interviews page. Check it out, lots of neat stuff from TR talked about there. It's the NorthJersey.com interview titled "DM Collaborator Maintains Integrity On His Own". Here is the link:

http://www.timreynolds.com/interviews/viewInterview.aspx?interviewID=42

Small, BUT INFORMATIVE, interview!!! ENJOY!!

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2006 :  4:34:34 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
New interview with TR about the Wilkes Barre, PA show, it's called "Reynolds Returns to River Street". You can read it at the following link:

http://www.timreynolds.com/interviews/viewInterview.aspx?interviewID=43

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 03/03/2006 :  8:57:41 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
New interview posted from the Diamond City paper about the Wilkes Barre, PA show:

http://www.timreynolds.com/interviews/viewInterview.aspx?interviewID=44

For more interviews with TR check out:

http://www.timreynolds.com/interviews/

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 03/07/2006 :  01:59:14 AM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
Here is a review of the 03/03/2006 Mexicali Blues show:

http://www.timreynolds.com/reviews/viewReview.aspx?reviewID=12



For other reviews, please check out:

http://www.timreynolds.com/reviews/

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 03/26/2006 :  12:55:05 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
03/03/06 Teaneck, NJ Mexicali Blues
Interviewed by Alan Goldstein of digitalsound.net
SPECIAL THANX to Jason "enthuTIMsiast" Martin for transcribing this entire 13 minute interview. You da man!!!

Link to transcript of interview:

http://www.timreynolds.com/interviews/viewInterview.aspx?interviewID=48

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 04/27/2006 :  9:43:44 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
Here is a new interview with TR. It has lots of info you don't generally read about TR. From Marin Independent Journal, Check it out:

http://www.timreynolds.com/interviews/viewInterview.aspx?interviewID=49



This is the photo that ran with the story online. For a larger version visit the story online and click on the photo:

http://www.marinij.com/fastsearchresults/ci_3734805#

So you know, if you can actually track down a "hard copy" of the original newspaper they used a different photo in the newspaper. Another awesome pic of TR.

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 06/04/2006 :  9:54:27 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
I have posted a new interview with TR that was done around the TIMe of the Santa Barbara show. You can read the full text at the following link:

http://www.timreynolds.com/interviews/viewInterview.aspx?interviewID=50

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 07/12/2006 :  10:15:42 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
OK folks, here is a new TR gem, its one of TR's fave printed interviews. Hell, with a title that includes drum machines and pig guts how can you go wrong. ENJOY!!!(I can't stop giggling, TR couldn't believe they actually printed it)

http://www.timreynolds.com/interviews/viewInterview.aspx?interviewID=52

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 11/01/2006 :  6:07:00 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
http://desmoinesregister.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20061008/ENT04/610080308/1046/ENT

Thanx to KevinLesko for finding this. I had been sending emails to the guy who did the interview but hadn't heard anything back. There is a great pic of TR drinking pineapple juice at the top of the interview. An unusual choice of which pic to use I thought. LOL

This interview was mentioned in one of my show reviews at that following link:

http://www.timreynolds.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=7249

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 01/31/2007 :  3:31:49 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
Reynolds brings varied string styles to Biltmore
MARK EARNEST
CALENDAR CORRESPONDENT
Posted: 1/26/2007


If all you know about Tim Reynolds is his lead guitar work with Dave Matthews, get ready for some surprises at his show on Feb. 2 at the Tahoe Biltmore in Crystal Bay. As his self-released albums attest, he's a very chameleonic musician.

Reynolds' albums cover a wide range of styles, from light acoustic material to heavy rock, from traditional blues to way-out-there experiments. He said in an interview from his home near Santa Fe, N.M., that he plans to play both electric and acoustic material in Tahoe, including some songs with drum machine backing.

It's that drive to tackle many styles that has driven Reynolds to release his own CDs for many years -- although he hasn't lost his sense of humor about being a do-it-yourselfer.

"I guess you can look at it two ways -- a guy who wants to be an independent artist, or a self-absorbed idiot," he said. "I like the freedom of having my wife (fashion designer Diane Thomas) be the only person I run things past."

Another advantage is Reynolds can write about whatever he feels like. Of late, that's extended to political and social concerns, although he said it's just one more part of the diversity of his music.

"Nobody likes preaching, but I want to provide information," Reynolds said. "Having met someone in government who's not an evil shape-shifting reptile helped me speak out more."

That non-reptilian is Democratic Congressman Dennis Kucinich, who ran for President in 2004 and is running again in 2008. Reynolds said that what Kucinich said was more important than whether he won. "They picked the easiest guy (ie: John Kerry). It may seem like an infinite and continuous defeat, but there are always the little things that push you through."

Reynolds has learned to triumph over adversity. In his bio, it states that most rock music was "forbidden" in his household when he was growing up. Reynolds said that restriction came from his father, a fundamentalist religious follower who also did two tours of duty in Vietnam.

"I had a loving dad, I don't want you to picture him in an evil way, but when he came back (from the war) and they were spitting on soldiers, he had a really harsh view about any music that might have come from that. I brought home a Hendrix record, 'Band of Gypsies,' and he just knew from the vibe it gave off. He didn't have to hear it. He destroyed that record, but I bought another one."

Reynolds first learned to play bass, then moved on to a variety of instruments, including guitar. He can play piano, sitar, violin, cello -- as he said, "anything with strings." Reynolds said that this quest to learn other instruments was simply experimentation with sound.

"Learning all these instruments was just figuring out what they do to bring out an emotion," he said. "With the violin, I learned how to play beyond the fretboard. There's a lot you can do up there. And like the low notes on the cello, it really expanded the range of my own guitar playing and gave me some ideas. It hasn't all been an overt influence, but it all gets sublimated into whatever mess I've created."

Those messes began gaining national attention when Reynolds lived in Charlottesville, Va. His band TR3 played the South frequently around the same time as the Dave Matthews Band. Reynolds is best known for his subsequent work with Matthews. The two released a 2-CD live album that sold very well, and Reynolds was prominently featured as part of Matthews' acoustic "VH1 Storytellers" TV special.

Reynolds said that the association with Matthews has led to different reactions to his own music.

"When I first started, in certain circles, I'd hear, 'I don't like Dave Matthews. Man, I hope you don't sound like him.' And I'd say, 'Sorry, but I don't care.' Then after 'Storytellers' came out, I was touring with a rock band (named Puke Matrix). We were really loud and dressed in black and shocked the f--k out of people. People were leaving the shows because it wasn't the same guy on 'Storytellers.'"

Reynolds, though, was quick to say that "I've experienced all the possible variations on this, but it's a positive thing. Dave is one of the nicest guys in the world, so you can't have anything other than a positive feeling about it."

http://news.rgj.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070126/ENT02/701260331/1059

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 03/26/2007 :  04:35:59 AM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
Here is the link to a NEW interview with TR from the Telluride Daily Planet in The Pulse section:

http://www.timreynolds.com/interviews/viewInterview.aspx?interviewID=54

Thanx to Katie Klingsporn and The Telluride Daily Planet for the interest and support! Here is a link if you would rather read it online from the Telluride Daily Planet instead:

http://telluridedailyplanet.com/articles/2007/03/23/the_pulse/pulse04.txt

The article was entitled:

Reynolds lives, breathes and makes fine music

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 05/04/2007 :  05:01:35 AM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
Here is another great story by Bob Costa announcing TR's upcoming show in Philly. He included some great interview stuff from TR from an interview he did with TR a while back at our last stop at The State Theatre in Falls Church, VA. Here is the link:

http://www.timreynolds.com/interviews/viewInterview.aspx?interviewID=55

THANX to Bob for all his support!

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 05/05/2007 :  5:54:20 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
Short before his performance with Dave Matthews in Boston, MA @ the Wang Center on 04/20/07, TR did a phone interview with Sara Kaufman. She was kind enuf to post it online. At the following link you can read the transcription and also download the audio recording of the interview if you prefer to hear it from TR's own lips. The transcription says "complete" but I haven't compared them. TR seemed to ramble on a few subjects and I am not sure that everything is there, so you may want to give it a listen for all of TR in his full, rambling glory.

http://www.timreynolds.com/interviews/viewInterview.aspx?interviewID=56

Thanx to Sara J. Kaufman for the interest and support and BIG thanx for sharing it with everyone!

ENJOY!!!

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 07/15/2007 :  1:00:39 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
Here is an oldie but a goodie I just discovered where TR mentions WHY he always changes the names on his setlists and talks about what he thinks about while on stage. Very interesting. LOL

ENJOY!

http://www.timreynolds.com/interviews/viewInterview.aspx?interviewID=57

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 08/17/2007 :  6:01:14 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
Here is a brand new one from the Charleston City Paper:

http://www.timreynolds.com/interviews/viewInterview.aspx?interviewID=58

ENJOY!!!

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 09/17/2007 :  11:32:51 AM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
We have a new one from the Fairfield County Weekly in support of TR's performance @ FTC Stage One in Fairfield, CT. This interview provided by Sean Corbett who always does a great job with capturing the essence of TR with a broader range of questions than most interviewers. ENJOY!!

http://www.timreynolds.com/interviews/viewInterview.aspx?interviewID=59

I met with Sean at the gig in Fairfield and there is a possibility that we will eventually have a complete transcript of his one hour conversation with TR. Apparently there were technical difficulties with the recording but Sean is hoping to salvage all or most of it. You can look forward to the possibility of that as well.

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 04/07/2008 :  04:31:42 AM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
Here is another GREAT one from Sean Corbett. The interview was immediately after the TR3 gig @ The Main Pub in Manchester, CT & the story came out in TIMe to support the gig at FTC Stage One in Fairfield, CT Officially this would be considered the first "full band" interview. Of course TR has been interviewed about TR3 before but this is the first TIMe that the entire band has been interviewed together. Check it out:

http://www.timreynolds.com/interviews/viewInterview.aspx?interviewID=61

Sean assures me that the recording of this interview came out great and at some point we will have a full transcript of the complete interview. WhooooHooooo! Something to look forward to as the band relishes this interview with Sean as one of the most fun and funniest things they did on the last run. ENJOY!!!

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 06/11/2008 :  3:08:00 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
The Shredder Cometh by Robert Costa

TR discusses working with DMB on the road, in the studio & his new incarnation of TR3:

http://www.timreynolds.com/interviews/viewInterview.aspx?interviewID=69

ENJOY!!!!!

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 10/10/2008 :  02:14:17 AM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
And a new one:

Reynolds: A Traveling Man by Nikki Mascali

http://www.timreynolds.com/interviews/viewInterview.aspx?interviewID=71

originally posted here:

http://www.theweekender.com/music/Reynolds__A_traveling_man_10-08-2008.html

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 11/03/2008 :  3:25:10 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
High Country Press by David Brewer 10/30/08

http://www.timreynolds.com/interviews/viewInterview.aspx?interviewID=72

orginally posted here:

http://www.highcountrypress.com/weekly/2008/10-30-08/tim_reynolds.htm

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 03/08/2010 :  8:05:20 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
Two GREAT, super-informative, recent interviews with TR:

1st one was done by Mike Rothman of the South Florida Sun Sentinel:

http://timreynolds.com/interviews/viewInterview.aspx?interviewID=75

2nd one TR answers Jerk’s questions on writing, inspiration, and going solo http://tinyurl.com/TRjerk by Scott Collison

OR

http://timreynolds.com/interviews/viewInterview.aspx?interviewID=74

ENJOY! I found BOTH very informative. I'm sure you will as well :)

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 08/11/2010 :  05:46:16 AM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
Here is an interview with TR & the rest of TR3 from West Palm Beach, FL

Tim Reynolds Takes Center Stage With TR3

http://www.timreynolds.com/interviews/viewInterview.aspx?interviewID=77

To see article with photos that originally appeared check out the interview here:

http://joonbug.com/miami/frequency/Tim-Reynolds-Takes-Center-Stage-With-TR3/xjaUJevQeEk

Here is a link to video of TR doing yoga backstage at Roxy's Pub in West Palm Beach, FL as discussed in the interview:

http://tinyurl.com/TRyoga






Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 01/14/2011 :  12:22:37 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
Here is an interview by Timothy Dwenger from Marquee Magazine just before his T&D performance at 1st Bank Center on 12/09/10. He talks alot about his early days in C-ville with Dave:

http://www.timreynolds.com/interviews/viewInterview.aspx?interviewID=78

Originally posted:

http://marqueemag.com/2010/12/01/dave-matthews-and-tim-reynolds/

Very informative. ENJOY!!


Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page

Fluffy
Administrator

USA
10739 Posts

Posted - 01/14/2011 :  12:23:30 PM  Show Profile  Send Fluffy an AOL message
FOR CLARIFICATION: The post above this one is always the new post to the thread. ENJOY!!!

If you feel the need to comment on something you read here, please do, it is encouraged, but please comment on the "comments..." thread OR start a new thread and link back to this thread in that one. I want to keep this thread free of board chatter and a place where people can just come and read the stories and not the opinions of everyone else who reads it. I would like this thread to be more of a reference tool. THANX

Here is a link to the "comments..." thread:

http://www.timreynolds.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=5219

To see all of the archived Interviews and Reviews click on the following links:

http://www.timreynolds.com/interviews/

http://www.timreynolds.com/reviews/

Peace & Keep the Faith
Fluffy
"THE MUSIC BUSINESS IS A CRUEL AND SHALLOW MONEY TRENCH-- A LONG PLASTIC HALLWAY WHERE THIEVES AND PIMPS RUN FREE AND GOOD MEN DIE LIKE DOGS. THERE'S ALSO A NEGATIVE SIDE..." -Hunter S. Thompson
Go to Top of Page
  Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
 New Topic  Topic Locked
 Printer Friendly
Jump To:
Tim Reynolds - Message Board © Back to the top Go To Top Of Page
Snitz Forums 2000